Soundproof box for under the table circular saw. - Router Forums
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post #1 of 32 (permalink) Old 01-09-2013, 06:22 AM Thread Starter
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Question Soundproof box for under the table circular saw.

I want to make a soundproof box for my circular saw because it is very noisy while in use. The saw runs with a 9.25 inches saw. It is very noisy. My neighours are annoyed but I need to use the saw to do some wood work lately. I know it it impossible to get 100% soundproof as there is an opening on the saw table. Just want to cut off as much machine noise as possible. Material I have on hand: 3/8", .5", and 6/8" plywood (all 4'X8') and some acoustic absorption foam (1M X 1.5M X 25mm). I have finished installing the saw under my 4' X 3' work bench today. Any suggestion in constructing this box would be very much appreciated.
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post #2 of 32 (permalink) Old 01-09-2013, 10:44 AM
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I would recommend enclosing the entire bench for the most affective results.
I say this for a couple of reasons;
1. You have a lot more air space between the source of the noise and the escape point of the noise. That is important because the more space you have to trap the noise, the more trapping materials you can put in place. Also the longer a sound wave travels the less intense it gets due to friction. Enclosures that are too small will produce vibrations of the enclosure itself that will cause it to start giving off its own noise, most likely a low frequency rumble and you'll have just turned your table saw into a sub-woofer.

2. Electric motors generate HEAT, if the heat is not dissipated properly you'll just wind up burning up your motor and having to buy a new one. Having more airspace will also allow the motor and surrounding materials to release excess heat more efficiently.
Remember heat, much like sound, travels in waves.

If you can foot the bill I would strongly advise using plexiglass as it has sound deadening characteristics. If you choose to use R-15 insulation don't just lay it flat and staple it, pinch sections of it up into a wavy pattern along your plywood. This helps to produces multiple surfaces for the sound to echo off us increasing your soundproofing.
Again, the longer the sound travels the weaker it gets, if you throw a rubber ball at a flat wall it will bounce off and continue going, but if the wall had say, wads of paper glued to it then threw the ball, the multiple angles of deflection would cause the ball to lose most of its momentum on its first strike and not travel as far.

Sorry, I really didn't mean to get so long winded.
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post #3 of 32 (permalink) Old 01-09-2013, 08:05 PM
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If it were me, I would use particle board (yuk) for the box. It's really dense and very effective as a sound deadener. That's why it is the go to material for speaker boxes. Also, remember that multiple layers are a must to deaden sound, with air space in between. Guy is correct when he recommends plexi as well. Acoustical windows are usually made like regular insulated windows except they use two different thicknesses of plexi or lexan for the panes. The different thicknesses are more effective because they break down different parts of the sound waves. Hope this made sense. I use particle board as an acoustical barrier simply because it is cheaper than plexi or lexan.

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post #4 of 32 (permalink) Old 01-09-2013, 08:51 PM
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How much of the noise is produced below the table and how much from above? You could try holding the sound deadening material around the bottom area and see how much difference it makes. That won't help the noise made by the exposed portion of the blade. Hanging heavy cloth or blankets from the ceiling around the saw will help that problem but I don't know how much. The cloth will help get rid of the high pitched noises which are the most annoying. Closing windows and doors will also help but it might be very hot inside for that where you live.

By the way, welcome to the forum.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #5 of 32 (permalink) Old 01-10-2013, 09:35 AM
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John; Welcome! First question I'd be asking is 'why's it so noisy?'
Is it loud when you're actually cutting something, or just about as bad when it's running without cutting? What's generating the noise, or is it a combination of things?
If you box in the cabinet part, but it's actually the blade (sort of like a siren effect), will that have accomplished anything?
For starters, I'd be trying to determine what's generating the noise and looking at reduction by eliminating/modifying the sources. Try a different brand of blade for example. I use CMT and my particular blade is extremely quiet, even when cutting. My dust collector is far louder, and it's pretty quiet, all things considered.
Another thing you might try is a new belt, assuming it's belt driven. Vibration may be a factor as well.
Good luck!
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post #6 of 32 (permalink) Old 01-10-2013, 01:19 PM
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My question would be, are you using the saw indoors or outdoors? If indoors, I would insulate the room first. That has provided enough sound dampening that I have never had any complaints about noise no matter what tools I run! If outdoors it will be hard to limit all sound from a circular saw. much of the noise comes from the blade, as was stated above. Also heat will be a consideration if the saw is confined in too small a box. A temporary fence covered with a blanket my block a lot of the noise if you are only concerned about 1 direction. Other than that, unless you are doing your cutting at 3AM in the morning and or all day every day, just informing your neighbors before hand may help!

I have found that hand tools are the best choice when I want to make mistakes at a slower rate of speed.

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post #7 of 32 (permalink) Old 01-14-2013, 07:00 AM Thread Starter
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Thumbs up Soundproofing box

Quote:
Originally Posted by PMC Tools View Post
I would recommend enclosing the entire bench for the most affective results.
I say this for a couple of reasons;
1. You have a lot more air space between the source of the noise and the escape point of the noise. That is important because the more space you have to trap the noise, the more trapping materials you can put in place. Also the longer a sound wave travels the less intense it gets due to friction. Enclosures that are too small will produce vibrations of the enclosure itself that will cause it to start giving off its own noise, most likely a low frequency rumble and you'll have just turned your table saw into a sub-woofer.

2. Electric motors generate HEAT, if the heat is not dissipated properly you'll just wind up burning up your motor and having to buy a new one. Having more airspace will also allow the motor and surrounding materials to release excess heat more efficiently.
Remember heat, much like sound, travels in waves.

If you can foot the bill I would strongly advise using plexiglass as it has sound deadening characteristics. If you choose to use R-15 insulation don't just lay it flat and staple it, pinch sections of it up into a wavy pattern along your plywood. This helps to produces multiple surfaces for the sound to echo off us increasing your soundproofing.
Again, the longer the sound travels the weaker it gets, if you throw a rubber ball at a flat wall it will bounce off and continue going, but if the wall had say, wads of paper glued to it then threw the ball, the multiple angles of deflection would cause the ball to lose most of its momentum on its first strike and not travel as far.

Sorry, I really didn't mean to get so long winded.

I have plywood, acoustic absorption foam and plexiglass (only 1mm in thickness). I will follow your suggestion of enclosing the sides and the bottom of the bench and see how it goes. Your suggestion is very much appreciated.
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post #8 of 32 (permalink) Old 01-14-2013, 07:07 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TRBaker View Post
If it were me, I would use particle board (yuk) for the box. It's really dense and very effective as a sound deadener. That's why it is the go to material for speaker boxes. Also, remember that multiple layers are a must to deaden sound, with air space in between. Guy is correct when he recommends plexi as well. Acoustical windows are usually made like regular insulated windows except they use two different thicknesses of plexi or lexan for the panes. The different thicknesses are more effective because they break down different parts of the sound waves. Hope this made sense. I use particle board as an acoustical barrier simply because it is cheaper than plexi or lexan.
I got plywood, foam and plexi (1mm). I will try to get some particle board too. Thank very much for your suggestion.
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post #9 of 32 (permalink) Old 01-14-2013, 07:27 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
How much of the noise is produced below the table and how much from above? You could try holding the sound deadening material around the bottom area and see how much difference it makes. That won't help the noise made by the exposed portion of the blade. Hanging heavy cloth or blankets from the ceiling around the saw will help that problem but I don't know how much. The cloth will help get rid of the high pitched noises which are the most annoying. Closing windows and doors will also help but it might be very hot inside for that where you live.

By the way, welcome to the forum.
I don't know how much noise there is above and below the work bench but I would enclosed the work bench with plywood, acoustic foam and plexiglass and see how it goes. Thank for your suggestion.
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post #10 of 32 (permalink) Old 01-14-2013, 07:35 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by DaninVan View Post
John; Welcome! First question I'd be asking is 'why's it so noisy?'
Is it loud when you're actually cutting something, or just about as bad when it's running without cutting? What's generating the noise, or is it a combination of things?
If you box in the cabinet part, but it's actually the blade (sort of like a siren effect), will that have accomplished anything?
For starters, I'd be trying to determine what's generating the noise and looking at reduction by eliminating/modifying the sources. Try a different brand of blade for example. I use CMT and my particular blade is extremely quiet, even when cutting. My dust collector is far louder, and it's pretty quiet, all things considered.
Another thing you might try is a new belt, assuming it's belt driven. Vibration may be a factor as well.
Good luck!
The saw gives out high pitch noise once it is started, It became more noisy while cutting. I will enclosed the bench with soundproof material (plywood, foam and plexiglass and perhaps particle board if I could get it). Where could I get that type of blade your are using? I made contact with Makita (Hong Kong). They have a blue ray blade but is said not to have much noise reducing effect. I will shop for the type of 'quiet' blade that you are using. Thanks.
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