Need to tap threads in wood - Router Forums
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post #1 of 33 (permalink) Old 01-10-2013, 03:49 PM Thread Starter
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Question Need to tap threads in wood

Morning folks.

Thinking about tapping holes for machine screws instead of wood screws. Particularly for jigs and fasteners.


I've chosen machine taps so I use a drill press chuck to keep the tap perpendicular to the wood.

Soooo.

I can get the appropriate drill bits here but which of these two type of taps would be best for use on wood, taking into account the possibility of blind holes?


Spiral Flute Tap Set



or

Spiral Point Tap Set

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post #2 of 33 (permalink) Old 01-10-2013, 05:04 PM
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It will be interesting to see how it works out. I wonder if changes in humidity will have any effect at all. Will the screws be removed and reinstalled from time to time?
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post #3 of 33 (permalink) Old 01-11-2013, 06:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cagenuts View Post
Morning folks.

Thinking about tapping holes for machine screws instead of wood screws. Particularly for jigs and fasteners.


I've chosen machine taps so I use a drill press chuck to keep the tap perpendicular to the wood.

Soooo.

I can get the appropriate drill bits here but which of these two type of taps would be best for use on wood, taking into account the possibility of blind holes?


Spiral Flute Tap Set



or

Spiral Point Tap Set

As shown, I've tapped many holes in hardwoods without a problem. I use a middle tap but would follow this with a plug tap for blind holes.
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post #4 of 33 (permalink) Old 01-11-2013, 06:40 AM
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I would think that both would be needed if you will be tapping blind holes.

The pointed ones would be needed to start the holes because of the taper on the pointed end needed to start the tap.
Then the other set is needed to run the threads all the way to the bottom of a blind hole which the other set can't do because of the taper on the threads.
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post #5 of 33 (permalink) Old 01-11-2013, 07:28 AM
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From my experience working with cast iron moldings, just use the flat bottomed bits, BUT only in a drill press. You'll never get them to start properly by hand but a press shouldn't have any problem. You'll also want the hardest wood you can get, 1. to hold the threads and 2. to avoid the soft wood from tearing.
Good luck, let us know how it turns out.
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post #6 of 33 (permalink) Old 01-11-2013, 08:20 AM
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Personally I do not tap wood but drill a hole and insert a helicoil - this is not going to tear-out and a generic version can be had at HF and of course there are the traditional brass inserts that screw in. I have hand tapped wood, and always hand tap metal but on wood these have worked much better for me and are much less expensive than the brass inserts. Good luck, Baker
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post #7 of 33 (permalink) Old 01-11-2013, 08:57 AM
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I tyr to use spiral taps as they seem to cut better in wood and metal. Some times I will run some super glue down the tapped threads and retap. Makes them a little stronger and durable.
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post #8 of 33 (permalink) Old 01-11-2013, 09:32 AM
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Tap type, in wood: Essentially it doesn't matter.
Rosewood, Jatoba, soft wood, taps are so hard they don't feel a thing in wood, MDF or plastic.
Spiral, straight, multifluted, not to worry. I use them all, whatever is handy.
A bottoming tap will buy you a few more threads in a blind hole but even that is often unnecessary.
Example.
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post #9 of 33 (permalink) Old 01-11-2013, 09:56 AM
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Hilton,
I do this daily and simply use brass inserts, propel nuts, helicoil or simply thread the required bolt into the wood. The bolt is harder than the wood, so it will "tap" just fine. With any of these methods, using a [non-running] drill press works perfectly. I even use this method on Crepe Myrtle, which is the hardest wood I am familiar with! Good Luck!
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post #10 of 33 (permalink) Old 01-11-2013, 10:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richtink View Post
Will the screws be removed and reinstalled from time to time?
That's what I'm wondering. I was brought up being taught that you use screws only if the item is intended to be taken apart. If it is not intended to be taken apart, you use nails.

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