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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-05-2013, 06:35 PM Thread Starter
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Default Jerry's Latest Idea

I am absolutely certain that what I tried to do today is old hat to most of the members of our forum. I know that using the Incra Express Sled is still the best way to crosscut narrow workpieces, but, just wanted to try this to see how it would work. It is lot easier to set up than the sled and it works. See the attached photos to see what I'm talking about if you are courious.

Jerry
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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-05-2013, 10:56 PM
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I would have one concern about this design over a sled or using a spacer block on the front end of the fence. The first is that you would need to push the piece all the way past the blade to make sure it doesn't bind. When you get to the back of the blade the teeth are coming up and there is nothing holding the piece down. There is some risk of the piece getting tossed. Have you noticed if any of the pieces have rattled against the saw teeth as they were going past the blade?

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-05-2013, 11:16 PM
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What Chuck said ... that is essentially trapping the piece between the fence and the blade. This is generally considered a no-no.

But the backing board looks like it does a pretty good job of keeping the cut piece square to the blade, so it is at least somewhat less likely to turn and cause a kickback.
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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-05-2013, 11:48 PM
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Chuck's right. I'd stop that practice before my luck ran out. Every time you trap a work piece between any cutter and a fence you should see a vision of a batting cage pitching machine hurling chunks of hard wood at your head.

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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-06-2013, 01:09 AM
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Jerry please watch this video, it is short but will explain why you should not do it your way and how to safetly make repeatable crosscuts.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tvG29zqvuas

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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-06-2013, 01:14 AM
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Jerry, was there not a similar post a month or so ago?

Not sure where you are going with this?

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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-06-2013, 08:53 AM
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Jerry, Eventually anyone doing this will have an injury of some kind - if you are really lucky it will only damage the workpiece, but more than likely you would get hit by a flying chunk(s) of wood. Another quite likely option is the do-it-yourself finger amputation! In the past when I've seen my helpers do this, I let them know in a very emphatic manner that is NEVER TO BE DONE!

When rip cut is made a long a fence, the longer workpieces have less tendency to skew slightly off-track than does a crosscut. With the crosscut, a teenie-weenie skew spells BIG PROBLEMS. Where you introduce the problem is at the friction against the fence.

(Cherryville) Chuck mentioned the stop-block nearest the infeed end of your fence. This is a method that we use * alot. Simply clamp a short stop-block to the infeed end of your fence - the protrusion SHOULD NOT be aligned with your blade tangent point - it should be closer to you. Use that stop-block as a reference point for multiple copies and if the workpiece is properly held-down - your workpiece is never exposed to fence friction simultaneously with being cut (friction ends prior to cut beginning). Many woodworkers literally wax their tablesaw tops and fences to minimize said friction.

* for crosscuts we most often go to the sliding compound miter saw. IN MY SHOP this is the better choice for boards up to about 16" wide.

Take care and be safe,
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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-06-2013, 10:45 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
I would have one concern about this design over a sled or using a spacer block on the front end of the fence. The first is that you would need to push the piece all the way past the blade to make sure it doesn't bind. When you get to the back of the blade the teeth are coming up and there is nothing holding the piece down. There is some risk of the piece getting tossed. Have you noticed if any of the pieces have rattled against the saw teeth as they were going past the blade?
Charles,
You are correct in that you must push the piece all the way through and no there is no rattle. I cut a half a dozen cuts and they were all as close as I have learned to expect my cuts to be, They varied in length by .008", the length beteen the shortest and the longest. It was just something to play with and see would happen,

Jerry
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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-06-2013, 11:17 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jw2170 View Post
Jerry, was there not a similar post a month or so ago?

Not sure where you are going with this?
Earlier posts were not of the sub fence or backing block as is what this thread is about. I am, in this thread just looking for a way to make the cross cuts
on narrow pieces and at the same time be able to use the cursor and scale on the Incra system. When using a block to gain space between the fence and workpiece the length of the block has to be added to the setting on the scale, I guess that I am guilty of always trying to re-invent the wheel. Sorry if this disturbs you. I am pretty sure that you are always trying to be helpful.

Jerry
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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-06-2013, 12:40 PM
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I often use my very accurate rip fence to line up a cut with the miter, but always move the fence before the cut. This is not the fastest or best way to do things when you need multiple pieces of the same length but for a quick cut or two that just need to be close it works out fine and I don't have to set up the sled or set blocks.

But never ever ever use the fence and the miter at the same time. You could put your eye out with that thing kid
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