Unisaw vs. Grizzly - Router Forums
 20Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 72 (permalink) Old 04-10-2013, 08:51 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Jerry
Posts: 2,645
 
Default Unisaw vs. Grizzly

There is place in Lubbock, Texas where I buy all of my lumber. Every time I go there to buy some material I just have to go over to their Unisaw and admire it. I know that it would be way over kill for a hobbyist like myself and that the saw is manufactured for commercial use. Grizzly makes a similar looking cabinet saw that sells for about half the cost of the Unisaw. It has a three HP motor so it has plenty of power. My question has to do with the difference between the two saws. I am sure that the construction of the Delta machine is much heavier than that of the Griz, but what else is makes the Unisaw twice as expensive as the Grizzly product?

Jerry
Jerry Bowen is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 72 (permalink) Old 04-10-2013, 10:40 PM
Moderation Team
 
MT Stringer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Mike
Posts: 5,712
 
Default

I don't know about the difference in weight but my Grizzly 1023RLW had a shipping weight of 452#.
MT Stringer is online now  
post #3 of 72 (permalink) Old 04-11-2013, 01:04 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Don
Posts: 142
 
Default

You must be talking about the latest version of the Unisaw. It has been redesigned, and is alot different then the earlier models.
The Jet and Grizzly cabinet saws are clones of the original Unisaw, some think perhaps better.
The newest unisaw has both handwheels on the front of the machine. I was able to look at one, it seemed very nice.
Any of the cabinet saws are just better, and easier to work with "in my opinion".
I much prefer the 12" saws, with 38"X48"table tops, gives around 6" more table up front of the blade.
Sawdust Don is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 72 (permalink) Old 04-11-2013, 06:07 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Jerry
Posts: 2,645
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sawdust Don View Post
You must be talking about the latest version of the Unisaw. It has been redesigned, and is alot different then the earlier models.
The Jet and Grizzly cabinet saws are clones of the original Unisaw, some think perhaps better.
The newest unisaw has both handwheels on the front of the machine. I was able to look at one, it seemed very nice.
Any of the cabinet saws are just better, and easier to work with "in my opinion".
I much prefer the 12" saws, with 38"X48"table tops, gives around 6" more table up front of the blade.
So far I am not hearing of enough difference in the saws to justify the price difference and that is what I am wondering about, you could buy a pretty nice lathe with the difference in the prices, right?

Jerry
Jerry Bowen is offline  
post #5 of 72 (permalink) Old 04-11-2013, 07:28 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Country: United States
First Name: Richard
Posts: 434
 
Send a message via Skype™ to rwbaker
Default Mrtising

The name adds a lot to the cost of any product and if you take a look at Popular Mechanics on Google from 1900 on the name "Delta and the Unisaw" have advertising and some very good woodworking projects . Grizzly on the other hand started in the 70's and merchandized from Taiwan/China after Jet did the same with merchandise from Japan in the 60's.

Delta and most others have had to redesign products based on world competition and pending state/US legislation against table saws. Jet is still very proud of there product (shows in price) but Grizzly has become a valued supplier of quality machinery and supporting products. I may not like some return policies but my son recently purchased a Grizzly Cabinet saw that easily betters my Powermatic or my friends Unisaw for 40 percent less.

If you have always wanted one and money is not important you can not go wrong with any of these or some others. Do yourself a favor and make yourself happy; buy what you want. Make sure you get a great fence and cut wood.

With best regards - Baker

Last edited by rwbaker; 04-11-2013 at 07:32 AM.
rwbaker is offline  
post #6 of 72 (permalink) Old 04-11-2013, 07:34 AM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 15,916
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MT Stringer View Post
I don't know about the difference in weight but my Grizzly 1023RLW had a shipping weight of 452#.
That's a fair bit heavier than my 15 year old Unisaw if I remember correctly. I think my Unisaw was around 300. I haven't used the Grizz or the Powermatic but everything I've heard about them is good and that both are in the same class as the Unisaw.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is offline  
post #7 of 72 (permalink) Old 04-11-2013, 07:44 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Jerry
Posts: 2,645
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rwbaker View Post
The name adds a lot to the cost of any product and if you take a look at Popular Mechanics on Google from 1900 on the name "Delta and the Unisaw" have advertising and some very good woodworking projects . Grizzly on the other hand started in the 70's and merchandized from Taiwan/China after Jet did the same with merchandise from Japan in the 60's.

Delta and most others have had to redesign products based on world competition and pending state/US legislation against table saws. Jet is still very proud of there product (shows in price) but Grizzly has become a valued supplier of quality machinery and supporting products. I may not like some return policies but my son recently purchased a Grizzly Cabinet saw that easily betters my Powermatic or my friends Unisaw for 40 percent less.

If you have always wanted one and money is not important you can not go wrong with any of these or some others. Do yourself a favor and make yourself happy; buy what you want. Make sure you get a great fence and cut wood.

With best regards - Baker
Richard,
You have just confirmed what I have suspected. The two Grizzly machines that I bought this year, a six inch jointer with spiral cutters, and a 17" band saw are such that I personally I could not ask for better ones.

Jerry
Jerry Bowen is offline  
post #8 of 72 (permalink) Old 04-11-2013, 07:44 AM
Registered User
 
tool613's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Country: Canada
First Name: jack English machines
Posts: 35
 
Default

The problem with this type of comparison is it only takes two saws that are for the most part the same. this class of saw is viewed by some to be the "OH my god i have a real industrial saw" when in fact it was and still is marketed to the armature.

the Uni was made many years ago and was one of the first saws(1930s) to have a tilting arbour with electric motor in a contained cabinet. This was a very innovative improvement in the 30s coming from a maker/inventor who made toy jig saws and sowing machines for little girls.


The UNI was in production for almost 70 years with very few changes and it took almost 30 years for motors to finely catch up to its 3 belt drive. The 3 beat drive was a way for delta to say it had lots of power even though it did not. The person open the hood/bonnet/blade opening, would see a large drive and be impressed. The very early saw were only 1 and 1.5/2 hp motors and as any with delta saw know this was not a stock motor and so you were stuck with there wonderful selection. mind you the first saws ran steel blades(no carbide teeth back than) that took less hp to cut if kept sharp and set. the point being is no other make used 3 belts to drive a small motor because it was not needed. add to that belt design by that time was prime and power transmission well know by the industry(flat belt machine) and you can conclude it was a gimmick.


you must include the General 650 the left tilt version of the old General 350 in this case. that brings in left tilt and so in that case you would get a powermatic 66 the real Maker of that version of saw. they did invent the left tilt 10" cabinet saw and the c frame motor mount makes it a better chose over the delta motor.

The new Uni from my understanding set the blade further back on the table and Deltas marketing claims its great to have more table in front of the blade for sheet stock cutting. Now that just a load of crap because every one knows that placing the handle up front cause them to set the blade further back.

Now if your a joint man /furniture maker/one man shop/hobby then your hanging over the blade to do joint like tenon ,box,mitres and your back is going to ache after a good session bent over. I know this because my 15" Poitras has lots of table in front of the blade and i like may General 350 that does not for this type work. IMO they added a gimmick and toasted the best part of the old saw(short distance to blade from front) for the handles up front design. The Delta was never as good as the General /Poitras or Powermatic(way more cast ARN on theses machines) so i can't see Delta dazzling me now.

Powermatic 66 is best in this class saw hands down. Now if you every wanted to see a real industrial saw from a time when saws were saws then you have to look in the last FWW Shop mag at the Wadkin PK pattern maker saw I restored from the 50s that was designed about the same time the Uni was oh and it had a real riving knife back than.

jack
English machines
bryansong likes this.
tool613 is offline  
post #9 of 72 (permalink) Old 04-11-2013, 07:56 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Jerry
Posts: 2,645
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by tool613 View Post
The problem with this type of comparison is it only takes two saws that are for the most part the same. this class of saw is viewed by some to be the "OH my god i have a real industrial saw" when in fact it was and still is marketed to the armature.

the Uni was made many years ago and was one of the first saws(1930s) to have a tilting arbour with electric motor in a contained cabinet. This was a very innovative improvement in the 30s coming from a maker/inventor who made toy jig saws and sowing machines for little girls.


The UNI was in production for almost 70 years with very few changes and it took almost 30 years for motors to finely catch up to its 3 belt drive. The 3 beat drive was a way for delta to say it had lots of power even though it did not. The person open the hood/bonnet/blade opening, would see a large drive and be impressed. The very early saw were only 1 and 1.5/2 hp motors and as any with delta saw know this was not a stock motor and so you were stuck with there wonderful selection. mind you the first saws ran steel blades(no carbide teeth back than) that took less hp to cut if kept sharp and set. the point being is no other make used 3 belts to drive a small motor because it was not needed. add to that belt design by that time was prime and power transmission well know by the industry(flat belt machine) and you can conclude it was a gimmick.


you must include the General 650 the left tilt version of the old General 350 in this case. that brings in left tilt and so in that case you would get a powermatic 66 the real Maker of that version of saw. they did invent the left tilt 10" cabinet saw and the c frame motor mount makes it a better chose over the delta motor.

The new Uni from my understanding set the blade further back on the table and Deltas marketing claims its great to have more table in front of the blade for sheet stock cutting. Now that just a load of crap because every one knows that placing the handle up front cause them to set the blade further back.

Now if your a joint man /furniture maker/one man shop/hobby then your hanging over the blade to do joint like tenon ,box,mitres and your back is going to ache after a good session bent over. I know this because my 15" Poitras has lots of table in front of the blade and i like may General 350 that does not for this type work. IMO they added a gimmick and toasted the best part of the old saw(short distance to blade from front) for the handles up front design. The Delta was never as good as the General /Poitras or Powermatic(way more cast ARN on theses machines) so i can't see Delta dazzling me now.

Powermatic 66 is best in this class saw hands down. Now if you every wanted to see a real industrial saw from a time when saws were saws then you have to look in the last FWW Shop mag at the Wadkin PK pattern maker saw I restored from the 50s that was designed about the same time the Uni was oh and it had a real riving knife back than.

jack
English machines
Jack,
Thank you for taking the time type this post, it is extremely interesting to me and I am sure that it is to other members of the forum too. Sounds like the Grizzly is still the best bet for me in regard to both money and application. Thanks again for your post.

Jerry
Jerry Bowen is offline  
post #10 of 72 (permalink) Old 04-11-2013, 08:01 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Duane
Posts: 1,709
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry Bowen View Post
Richard,
You have just confirmed what I have suspected. The two Grizzly machines that I bought this year, a six inch jointer with spiral cutters, and a 17" band saw are such that I personally I could not ask for better ones.

Jerry
I feel the same way about my Grizzly G1023, Jerry. It is 18 years old now, and works just as well as it did when I bought it! It is the saw used in the pics yesterday. I made the same comparisons back then, and decided the Delta wasn't worth nearly double the money. I have never regretted that choice. As you may have noticed, I am using a Delta miter gauge, though! The miter guage that came with the Grizzly had a lot of slop between the bar and the miter head! Why Grizzly used that with an otherwise excellent saw, I really don't know! Probably will opt for an Incra one of these days.

I have found that hand tools are the best choice when I want to make mistakes at a slower rate of speed.

I don't suffer from insanity. I enjoy every minute of it.

Last edited by Dmeadows; 04-11-2013 at 08:04 AM.
Dmeadows is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Grizzly GO462 vs, Delta 46 460 Jerry Bowen Tools and Woodworking 3 02-24-2013 07:22 PM
Grizzly jointer larryf Tools and Woodworking 11 01-21-2013 07:08 AM
Iíve taken Grizzly off of my buying list JohnnyB60 Lobby 21 06-12-2012 04:31 PM
Grizzly tent sale Jack Wilson Tools and Woodworking 5 05-24-2012 08:08 AM
Grizzly Shaper JMK Tools and Woodworking 4 10-31-2009 07:51 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome