Fe+ar Of Getting Finger To Close To TS Blade - Router Forums
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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-15-2013, 03:57 AM Thread Starter
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Default Fe+ar Of Getting Finger To Close To TS Blade

After submitting this thread I see that there is an error in the title, it should read, Preventing the danger of getting fingers to close to the TS blade. I don't know how to edit the title so have added this explanation.


I recently had a need to cutd four workpieces that were about three inchs long with the ends cut at 45 degrees. I was using the the Incra Express Sled with the Incra Miter gauge installed. As you can imagine the first 45 degree cut was easy in that it was cut from a long piece of stock. Just to be more clear, the workpieces were about an inch an a half wide, I am telling you this just so you might better visualize what was going one. Anyway, the second cut was the scary one. After the stop on the fence was brought so that all four pieces would be near the same length, in this application exact length was no important but getting reasonably close would be good enough.

Anyway, as you might be able to imagine, putting those short piece through the TS blade meant that my fingers were way to close to the blade for comfort. I got the pieces cut but later, after considering the danger, I knew that I need a better approach to doing this if and when it ever comes up again.

So here is my plan, and though it may seem quite obvious to most experienced members of this forum, if it saves just one persons fingers it is important to explain what my thinking is. Here goes. first cut four pieces of the stock that you want to cut the four short final pieces from. I mean four pieces that are the width and thinkness of the final four pieces that you want. In this csse I would cut these first four piece at least ten inches long. and then cut one of the ends of each of them at 45 degrees. Once that is done, the stop on the fence can be set quite a distance from the plade so that the secpmd cut at 45 degrees can be done with out having to get one's fingers dangereously close to the blade. Before making that last one, the four pieces that are to be cut need to be cut to the same length so that when using the stop on the fence the resulting length of each of the final pieces will be the same. Hope you follow may thinking on this.

Here is just one example how of how an new comer to woodworking learns from need how to do a simple but potentially dangereous job. I am not sure how this could be accomplished without a fence without a fence with a stop not being attached to the miter gauge, will have to think about that one, but since I do have the fence etc., I probably won't spend a lot of time on how to do it

Jerry

Last edited by Jerry Bowen; 04-15-2013 at 04:02 AM.
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-15-2013, 07:22 AM
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Hi Jerry.

That is a good reason to make a saw sled with hold downs.


James
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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-15-2013, 07:29 AM
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Though it would mean changing the gauge 8 times, with the Incra you could alternate the direction of the cut each cut and cut the pieces from one long piece. (16-24")

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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-15-2013, 07:45 AM
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Can the small piece of wood be clamped to your miter saw, then cut?
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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-15-2013, 07:59 AM
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+1 on making a sled. Then you don't have to hold the small parts as you just clamp them down safely.
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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-15-2013, 09:06 AM
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Jerry, If I caught one of my guys cutting itty-bitty pieces on a tablesaw - his butt would get kicked (figuratively speaking of course). In our case, a much better method would be to utilize the sliding compound miter saw. We get into stuff like that every day and it is very imporant to begin with the right tool. Repetitively cut complementary angles require carefully placed and safely clamped stop blocks. Also keep dust and shavings from interfering with workpiece to fence/stop block contact. Cutting tiny pieces as you have described with a table saw is asking for trouble IMHO. We often need dozens (or even hundreds) of identical copies of a small part and it is honestly one of the easiest chores in the shop; but like anything else: GOOD METHODS STILL REQUIRE GOOD EQUIPMENT AND A MATCHING SKILL SET. ONE's MIND MUST NOT WANDER FAR - OR ONE's FINGER JUST MIGHT "WANDER FAR".

Let's say you must make numerous pieces exactly alike: Fiddle around as required to product a perfect piece and then use carefully positioned stop blocks, clamps, etc. to make duplicates. Use of safety skills is super important when making repetitive pieces, because this is often where someone's mind will wander. None of us are robots!

At the end of the day, you should still be able to count to 10 on your fingers!
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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-15-2013, 09:31 AM
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Otis you are so very right about getting close to the blade and mind wandering on repetitive cuts. I learned the hard way and ended up with a thumb that still works but an index finger that is perfect for holding a golf club but does not articulate anymore. Safety First! Willie
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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-15-2013, 10:13 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jw2170 View Post
Hi Jerry.

That is a good reason to make a saw sled with hold downs.



James,
I do use the Incra Express Sled, but the hold down that is Included with the sled will not reach close enough to the blade in the situation I have described in the thread, thus the reason for the work around that I have attempted to describe.

I will sure be looking into some other hold down systems like you are showing, thanks for the tip and attempt to be of help to me once more.

Jerry

Last edited by Jerry Bowen; 04-15-2013 at 10:15 AM.
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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-15-2013, 10:16 AM
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You could just use a hand saw.
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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 04-15-2013, 11:09 AM
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Jerry, The jig shown is simple to make. Shown is a carrier board say 1/2"x 8"x 8", with a 1-1/2"x 3/4 diagonal set at 45 degrees and glued to the base. the hold down is 1/2"x2"x4" long and a 3/8" hole centered in it. Glue an eraser to grip the small part to the hold down and glue a pivot block to the opposite end of the hold down block. Drill and countersink holes thru the base and install a 5/16" carriage bolt with nut to hold the part. To use it set your fence to put the base flush with the blade and push thru keeping your hand on the diagonal brace and pressure against the fence. This can be used on either end depending on what side of the fence you use it and it keeps tear-out to a minimum. In the picture the small part is in red, the eraser is yellow.
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