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post #1 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-23-2013, 08:22 PM Thread Starter
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Default sanding drum stem

Hello all. I need some advice on a homemade sanding drum for my drill press, so naturally I'm asking the smartest bunch of people around.

I was out in the workshop (my 1/4 of the garage) early Sunday morning and found the need for a long, slim sanding drum for a bandsaw box I'm doing. I needed one at least 4 1/2 inches long by about an inch diameter. Besides not being able to spend a lot for a new drum, I couldn't even find anything that size online.

I poked around in my junk and came up with a piece of 3/4" ID pvc water pipe. It's slightly over 1" OD but close enough. I found some rubber grommets that were on packing screws on the new furnace that fit the ID of the pipe and the hole in the center of the grommets was a snug fit for a 1/2" threaded rod.

I cut the pvc pipe 6" long and used nuts and washers to pinch the pipe/grommet assembly tight. For the time being I just taped the sandpaper to the pipe with double sided, wrapped it tight, then used 3/4" masking tape around the top and bottom of the paper. 3/4" at the top and bottom left 4 1/2" of the drum to wrap the paper on.

I put the drum into the drill press and, surprisingly, it worked fairly well. But it sometimes loosens in the chuck and gets out of perpendicular to the table. Then I have to straighten and retighten. I'm thinking that maybe the threads on the rod are mashing when the drum gets some side pressure. It could be dangerous, certainly inaccurate, and a pain to have to stop and remount it.

If it is being caused by the threads on the rod mashing, does anyone have any suggestions for wrapping the threads with anything to keep it tight in the chuck? Thanks. Jim
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post #2 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-23-2013, 11:38 PM
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The threads are probably getting squashed but threaded rod is also very soft compared to an average bolt. You could use a 7 or 8" bolt by welding a washer onto the shank far enough from the head to allow the chuck to grip it after the head is cut off.

You should know that the bearings in a drill press aren't made for lateral loading. If you do a lot of sanding this way you will take them out. Lee Valley has a bearing support for the bottom end that will help (item 68Z02.20). If you could rig up something to support the bottom end your bearings will last longer.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #3 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-24-2013, 06:03 AM
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How about mounting it in a hand drill with the threads that are causing the problem out, then hold with bolt horizontal across grinding wheel (f you have a grinder). Grinder removes threads, hand drill keeps it round. Or find a friend with a lathe, mount the threaded ror, and gently touch with a metal file, or small grinding stone ( Dremel, angle grinder)
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post #4 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-24-2013, 07:06 AM
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Two things come to mind, first use a long bolt instead of the threaded rod it won't have threads all the way to the end. Second put the threaded rod into the drill press and use a file against it as it moves to remove the threads at the bottom, then put the smooth end in the drill press.
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post #5 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-24-2013, 07:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chessnut2 View Post
Hello all. I need some advice on a homemade sanding drum for my drill press, so naturally I'm asking the smartest bunch of people around.

I was out in the workshop (my 1/4 of the garage) early Sunday morning and found the need for a long, slim sanding drum for a bandsaw box I'm doing. I needed one at least 4 1/2 inches long by about an inch diameter. Besides not being able to spend a lot for a new drum, I couldn't even find anything that size online.

I poked around in my junk and came up with a piece of 3/4" ID pvc water pipe. It's slightly over 1" OD but close enough. I found some rubber grommets that were on packing screws on the new furnace that fit the ID of the pipe and the hole in the center of the grommets was a snug fit for a 1/2" threaded rod.

I cut the pvc pipe 6" long and used nuts and washers to pinch the pipe/grommet assembly tight. For the time being I just taped the sandpaper to the pipe with double sided, wrapped it tight, then used 3/4" masking tape around the top and bottom of the paper. 3/4" at the top and bottom left 4 1/2" of the drum to wrap the paper on.

I put the drum into the drill press and, surprisingly, it worked fairly well. But it sometimes loosens in the chuck and gets out of perpendicular to the table. Then I have to straighten and retighten. I'm thinking that maybe the threads on the rod are mashing when the drum gets some side pressure. It could be dangerous, certainly inaccurate, and a pain to have to stop and remount it.

If it is being caused by the threads on the rod mashing, does anyone have any suggestions for wrapping the threads with anything to keep it tight in the chuck? Thanks. Jim
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post #6 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-24-2013, 08:58 AM
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Shopsmith makes an extra long drum. It is used so you can put different grits on the same drum. Start with 60 then move head up and use 120 already on the drum then one more time and 220 on the bottom of the drum.

I want this item but haven't gotten around to getting it yet. The Shopsmith handles this load pretty well and is designed to do the job a little better than your regular drill press. If this is an operation you perform often you might take a look at a used SS. You can find them pretty cheap.
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post #7 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-24-2013, 11:01 AM
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Hi Jim, I would suggest screwing a 1/2 inch rod coupling onto the stem, this will strengthen it and give you a much better chuck bite.

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Last edited by Willway; 04-24-2013 at 11:04 AM.
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post #8 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-24-2013, 04:19 PM
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Here's the perfect solution to your problem from Wood Mag. This solves the lateral loading problem and allows for multiple sizes. Shouldn't take too long to whip out several of these for easily changing grits also.

Extra-Long Drum Sander
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post #9 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-24-2013, 05:50 PM
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post #10 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-25-2013, 03:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by supercat View Post
Here's the perfect solution to your problem from Wood Mag. This solves the lateral loading problem and allows for multiple sizes. Shouldn't take too long to whip out several of these for easily changing grits also.

Extra-Long Drum Sander
Adapt that with a bottom bearing and you wouldnt have to worry about the plywood elongating

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