Craftsman table saw repair - Router Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-21-2013, 01:13 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Jack
Posts: 25
 
Default Craftsman table saw repair

I have an older Craftsman table saw purchased used. It is a model 315.228310. The original owner used a too short key in the arbor drive pulley that allowed the pulley to "work" a bit. The pulley and arbor shaft are not useable. "All wallered out" as they say in East Tennessee. Parts are available I think. When I looked at the Sears parts blowups it looked like it would be easier to remove the arbor support yoke to work on outside the confines of the saw than to disassemble the entire saw to take the arbor out. Does anyone have any experience with this sort of thing? I'll even take "advice" which might be suspect. I find that much advice is not based on actual experience. I also know that "experience is an expensive teacher but a fool will learn by no other." I'd prefer to rely on the actual experience of my fellow woodworkers than learn the wrong thing all by myself.
59405 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-21-2013, 05:43 PM
Registered User
 
Knothead47's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Country: United States
First Name: John
Posts: 2,583
 
Default

Quote:
Parts are available I think.
I hope so, too. Good luck.

John T.
Equestrians are stable people.
Knothead47 is offline  
post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-22-2013, 07:03 AM
Moderation Team
 
BrianS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Country: Canada
First Name: Brian
Posts: 2,413
 
Send a message via Skype™ to BrianS
Default

Jack, is it just the keyway that is damaged, or something else on the arbor? I've never done it, but I have heard of people repairing the keyway with liquid steel or even JB Weld. Might be worth a shot. The pulley should be cheap to replace. Do a google on keyway repair, lots of "how-to" examples.

Brian


Sometimes I wonder whether the world is being run by smart people who are putting us on
or by imbeciles who really mean it.

(Origin uncertain)

Last edited by BrianS; 05-22-2013 at 07:09 AM.
BrianS is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-22-2013, 07:21 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Duane
Posts: 1,709
 
Default

I'd change the arbor, since it is(while it is!) available. It should not be too difficult. Remove the table from the cabinet. Turn it upside down, and it should be reasonably accessible. You will likely have to do some filing to get the arbor out because of the wallowing!

I have found that hand tools are the best choice when I want to make mistakes at a slower rate of speed.

I don't suffer from insanity. I enjoy every minute of it.
Dmeadows is offline  
post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-22-2013, 09:53 AM
Registered User
 
Harrison67's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Harrison
Posts: 261
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gravytrain View Post
I have an older Craftsman table saw purchased used. It is a model 315.228310. The original owner used a too short key in the arbor drive pulley that allowed the pulley to "work" a bit. The pulley and arbor shaft are not useable. "All wallered out" as they say in East Tennessee. Parts are available I think. When I looked at the Sears parts blowups it looked like it would be easier to remove the arbor support yoke to work on outside the confines of the saw than to disassemble the entire saw to take the arbor out. Does anyone have any experience with this sort of thing? I'll even take "advice" which might be suspect. I find that much advice is not based on actual experience. I also know that "experience is an expensive teacher but a fool will learn by no other." I'd prefer to rely on the actual experience of my fellow woodworkers than learn the wrong thing all by myself.



I have around 65+ years experience with Metalworking, and I'd suggest getting it welded up and getting the keyway re-machined. No big deal with a guy who knows metal properties, and is a good weldor.

Or, machine a brand new arbor from bar stock.

Anything less, is a temporary fix. IOW, you will have to have it redone one of these years.

Harrison
Harrison67 is offline  
post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-24-2013, 09:38 AM
Registered User
 
MAFoElffen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Mike
Posts: 2,369
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Harrison67 View Post
I have around 65+ years experience with Metalworking, and I'd suggest getting it welded up and getting the keyway re-machined. No big deal with a guy who knows metal properties, and is a good weldor.

Or, machine a brand new arbor from bar stock.

Anything less, is a temporary fix. IOW, you will have to have it redone one of these years.
+1

This is exactly what I was thinking I would do, before I got to this post. It is not timed so where that keyway is cut is not important rotation-wise. It could be welded up as filler (The old slot) and the keyway cut into the opposite side. They could bring the arbor flange into true while they are at it...

I have to say that with rebuilding old iron woodworking machinery and building new jigs and "things" for my other woodworking tools, I do my own welding, but I do have a relationship with a machine shop... The main guy there seems to have a curious interest in the things I come up with. He always meets me at the office with a pad and pencils and a smile... Asking what we are doing now.

Example- my latest is having a router chuck adapter for my RAS machined out of a Porter Cable 890 arbor shaft... He wants the power unit there to check the fit... 20,000 rpm tool speed. He want's to make sure eveything lines up. That's a good thing.

***If for you, If you can get an arbor new. It's going to be cheaper than to have it welded and machined. Machine shops are generally expensive. I understand that I tend to get the entertainment value, veteran/legacy old-timer discount.

But even new, I check my new arbors with a dial indicator. You would be surprised how much some new arbors are off (Quality Control). Easy to dress it to bring them back in. .005" off on the arbor flange can mean a whole lot more off further out on a 10" or 12" blade... And you would be surprised in how much a better cut, less noise and vibration there is when you do than.

Remember, since you took the trunions loose... When you get it back together- re-align and true your saw to the left miter slot, both at 0 and 45.

"Don't worry, I saw this work in a cartoon once."
"Usually learning skills and tooling involves a progression of logical steps."

Last edited by MAFoElffen; 05-24-2013 at 10:03 AM.
MAFoElffen is offline  
post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-24-2013, 10:37 PM
Registered User
 
MAFoElffen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Mike
Posts: 2,369
 
Default

I found it... This may help you get things back in tune:
http://www.routerforums.com/tools-wo...aw-tuning.html

I wrote out how I tuned my saws. (I'll have to write a new one for my new saw....)

"Don't worry, I saw this work in a cartoon once."
"Usually learning skills and tooling involves a progression of logical steps."
MAFoElffen is offline  
post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-25-2013, 07:47 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Duane
Posts: 1,709
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MAFoElffen View Post
+1


Remember, since you took the trunions loose... When you get it back together- re-align and true your saw to the left miter slot, both at 0 and 45.
Don't really think it is necessary to loosen the trunions to change the arbor on that saw!

Depends on the charges for repairing the old arbor, I am guessing it may be a wash cost wise vs replacement. I would remove it to repair anyway so the labor is the same.

I have found that hand tools are the best choice when I want to make mistakes at a slower rate of speed.

I don't suffer from insanity. I enjoy every minute of it.
Dmeadows is offline  
post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-25-2013, 08:33 AM
Registered User
 
MAFoElffen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Mike
Posts: 2,369
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dmeadows View Post
Don't really think it is necessary to loosen the trunions to change the arbor on that saw!

Depends on the charges for repairing the old arbor, I am guessing it may be a wash cost wise vs replacement. I would remove it to repair anyway so the labor is the same.
Agreed. Even if he had problems getting the 2 allen head set screws loose in the pulley, the pully off and the e-clip holding the arbor in... if he still couldn't get the arbor out, the arbor housing is just held in on it's pivot by a snap ring and washer. Taking it out by either of those two ways, he wouldn't have to take the trunions loose.

I mentioned that because he mentioned:
Quote:
When I looked at the Sears parts blowups it looked like it would be easier to remove the arbor support yoke to work on outside the confines of the saw than to disassemble the entire saw to take the arbor out.
For me, with a saw that size, I'd just flip it over onto it's top. No sense in acrobatics and contortion if you don't have to.

"Don't worry, I saw this work in a cartoon once."
"Usually learning skills and tooling involves a progression of logical steps."
MAFoElffen is offline  
post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 06-03-2013, 04:26 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Country: India
First Name: N/a
Posts: 2
 
Default

Great share keep it up.
vridhisharma is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Craftsman table jjammo1 General Routing 1 01-22-2011 07:18 AM
Craftsman 2hp professional router table combo... Duane867 Table-mounted Routing 2 01-03-2010 11:12 PM
Table mounting questions for a Craftsman router. tdsapp Table-mounted Routing 25 12-17-2009 07:58 PM
Craftsman Router & Bosch Table camelracer Table-mounted Routing 13 01-19-2009 06:32 PM
10" Craftsman Table saw given to me GoonMan Tools and Woodworking 6 05-06-2005 08:44 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome