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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-24-2013, 08:43 PM Thread Starter
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I've seen the DC remotes. I saw the plug-in where you plug a saw and a DC into a "box" where if you turn on the saw, the DC comes on...

I just saw a great shop video. He had micro-switches attached to his dust gates. When he pulled any dust gate open from anywhere in his shop, his DC turned on.

Been thinking how to do that.

I'm thinking micro-switches is not a problem itself. Used in a lot of manufacturing applications. If 110 volt, a lot a wear on the contacts. If 24 volt... extended life, but then you might have to use an actuated switch or relay... Anyone with ideas?

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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-25-2013, 01:07 AM
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I just wired mine up with 2 3-way light switches to the plug-in box that the DC plugs into. One on each wall my equipment is along. It's only a couple of steps to each one from any machine. To me, the idea of having to look after a remote doesn't seem appealing. The micro switches sound okay. What are they worth?

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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-25-2013, 02:23 AM Thread Starter
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I just wired mine up with 2 3-way light switches to the plug-in box that the DC plugs into. One on each wall my equipment is along. It's only a couple of steps to each one from any machine. To me, the idea of having to look after a remote doesn't seem appealing. The micro switches sound okay. What are they worth?
That is also a good idea.

I did some homework. Micro-switches are rated to 240 vac and up to 25 amps. The norm is to 16 amps. That would cover a 2hp DC. At that amperage, you wouldn't need a relay. Micro switches at that rating run about $6-$7 each. The line could go to each micro-switch, with the return going to the line on the DC plugin. A bracket made for each micro-switch... Then wiring.

A lot less cost than a remote!!! But walking a few steps to one of a couple 3-way switches is a bit cheaper.

"Don't worry, I saw this work in a cartoon once."
"Usually learning skills and tooling involves a progression of logical steps."
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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-25-2013, 03:17 AM
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I've seen the DC remotes. I saw the plug-in where you plug a saw and a DC into a "box" where if you turn on the saw, the DC comes on...

I just saw a great shop video. He had micro-switches attached to his dust gates. When he pulled any dust gate open from anywhere in his shop, his DC turned on.

Been thinking how to do that.

I'm thinking micro-switches is not a problem itself. Used in a lot of manufacturing applications. If 110 volt, a lot a wear on the contacts. If 24 volt... extended life, but then you might have to use an actuated switch or relay... Anyone with ideas?
Mike I would take a look at a solid state relay. Most work on 3 to 90v input AC or DC and either 110 or 220 switching. The newer ones very seldom fail and are cheap enough to keep a spare on hand. A better option is a air conditioning relay, also inexpensive. The Packard relay is rated at 30amp and is a 2 pole relay, so for switching a 110v circuit you just use 1 pole, or if you chose you can hook up for 220v. I have bought several of these and they work great, I have never had to go back on any of them I have installed. I never liked calbacks! And you cant beat the price!!!

25A SSR DC-AC Solid State Relay w/ Heatsink: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific

Packard C230A 2 Pole 30 Amp Contactor 24 Volt Coil Contactor: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific

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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-25-2013, 04:03 AM
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Mike the wiring can be ran with simple doorbell wire, and a doorbell transformer for power. When you get ready just PM me and I will send you a layout with a list of the parts you need. It is really inexpensive and simple to do this with switching from any machine. It can even be done with regular 3way and 4way light switches. Or even mini micro switches on the blast gates.

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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-25-2013, 08:05 AM
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I have set up a few systems with remote controls, works great for bigger shops. Be careful with relay's amp ratings, they are usually for resistance load and the motor rating is MUCH lower than amps would imply.
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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-25-2013, 08:29 AM
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Mike, I agree with Dick.. low voltage control circuit and a contactor/relay to switch the DC. Simple and safe!

I have found that hand tools are the best choice when I want to make mistakes at a slower rate of speed.

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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-25-2013, 09:23 AM
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That is also a good idea.

I did some homework. Micro-switches are rated to 240 vac and up to 25 amps. The norm is to 16 amps. That would cover a 2hp DC. At that amperage, you wouldn't need a relay. Micro switches at that rating run about $6-$7 each. The line could go to each micro-switch, with the return going to the line on the DC plugin. A bracket made for each micro-switch... Then wiring.

A lot less cost than a remote!!! But walking a few steps to one of a couple 3-way switches is a bit cheaper.
I am bad with elapsed time but I would say that I've had them hooked up that way for up to 10 years and no problems. I don't know if I bothered to check the rating on the switches or if they are even rated for 240v as the DC is rated 9 amps at that voltage. BTW, I have been assuming that yours is basically the same as mine as I believe that they may all be made in the same factory in Taiwan since every one I've seen for the DIY market looks so similar. Mine is 9A, 240v induction motor, 6" intake at the impeller housing.

I thought, as Dick suggested, that if you needed one more location that you could go with a 4way. One thing you may want to consider is how easy it will be to get to the switches. According to the pic of the new saw, this is presently an issue. Micro switches at the machine would eliminate that problem and would also eliminate the problem of forgetting to close blast gates when not in use.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-25-2013, 09:37 AM Thread Starter
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Hmmm...

"Don't worry, I saw this work in a cartoon once."
"Usually learning skills and tooling involves a progression of logical steps."
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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-25-2013, 09:48 AM
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Hello all
I use this system in mi shop.
You must ave a tranformer 110 / 24v and a relai
I join the electric shema
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