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post #1 of 31 (permalink) Old 06-07-2013, 09:18 PM Thread Starter
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Default Breaking down sheets

Remembering me saying "and if I had to break down sheets"... with this new saw?

Yes. Getting home today, the neighbor is having a grad party tomorrow for her daughter. The tables they were getting for it fell through. So I ripped some sheets for her 2x8, along with 8 2x4's for table tops. Let her borrow all my saw horses.

Boy. I had the move the DC out the garage door and plug it in outside (darn short cord) with the separator all the way against the wall with the lid turned just right so the sheet cleared the hoses. Out with the pallet jack and lawnmower. Then had to push my MIG cart all the way in front of the garage sideways against the washer to make room for the cut... Everything else either cleared or was under the slider and sheet.

That was most of the work. Really. Set the rip fence to 24" (minus half the kerf), pulled the sliding table back and locked it. Set the sheet on the table. Locked the sheet down. Unlocked the table and slide it forward... Then push it the last 2 feet or so. Took the pieces off and repeated for the other sheets.

I didn't have counter-balance the sheet for the last of the cut. With the riving knife, no binding at all. (I didn't have to stop and clamp the pieces together a kerf apart at the leading edge, then continue cutting...) No struggling. Then the neighbor commented that that seemed easy and couldn't imagine doing that alone on a regular table saw.

Flashbacks and a chill. Stuff for nightmares working long hours days on end, coming up with ways to do things alone and trying to use leverage and other things to try to make up for only have 2 hands. It didn't used to be that easy.

Instead I smiled and told her I used to, but now my back surely appreciates this. (But thought to myself- I am grateful.)

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Last edited by MAFoElffen; 06-07-2013 at 09:24 PM.
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post #2 of 31 (permalink) Old 06-08-2013, 12:36 AM
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I worked in a shop a while back that had a saw like yours. It sat in a room all by itself that wasn't much smaller than your carport. Have you begun working on plan B yet?

I was planning on mentioning to you that if you ever do long 45 degree miters, such as for legs or columns, that the sliding table is ideal for that and will make them nearly flawless with a jig that will hold them steady on the sliding table. The mantle factory I worked in made corners like that and just a few days before I left I tried a prototype jig that made them with an almost invisible joint.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #3 of 31 (permalink) Old 06-08-2013, 02:29 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
I worked in a shop a while back that had a saw like yours. It sat in a room all by itself that wasn't much smaller than your carport. Have you begun working on plan B yet?
Plan B? Right now it's in the garage with everything else and no carport yet (plans drawn). If she's still game and it goes, then I want the saw still in the garage, but other things to the carport. (workbech, drill press, router tables, her sunbed...)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherryville Chuck View Post
I was planning on mentioning to you that if you ever do long 45 degree miters, such as for legs or columns, that the sliding table is ideal for that and will make them nearly flawless with a jig that will hold them steady on the sliding table. The mantle factory I worked in made corners like that and just a few days before I left I tried a prototype jig that made them with an almost invisible joint.
More please... Do tell!!! Project- Light houses. Octagonal with a taper. Will end up being long tapered compound miters... And always thirsty to learn something new and different.

I've been thinking about that allot. I have some ideas. That's why I ordered a second table clamp and have some toggle clamps set aside.

I figure if I rip a straight edge on what I'll call the taper jig. Put a block onto one edge to help catch the trailing corner of the stock... put the toggle clamps on the jig to hold the stock... Use the fence and accessory hold-downs to hold the jig at a set angle... I see marking it to one of the miter t-slots in fractional inches of taper per/foot. Then I could use that jig for both tapers and to cut my glue edge stock... At least, that is adapted from what I've seen and done... and how I see it in my head.

I have also seen it done with 2 crosscut fences, with a board clamped at an angle between them, set at the angle you would need to create the taper. I've done that with 2 fences, but instead of worrying about angles, used the scales on the two fences to figure out the taper. Then the stock goes against the board and the trailing fence.

I also have seen Felder's Electronic Miter Gauge attachment that looks like a right angled square that is attached to the table itself. The 90 of the fixture goes to towards the blade and pivots there... locks on on the table edge. Angle sets like a protractor. Work goes to the leading part, whereas the other side of the 90 can have a sacrificial stock for backing/tearout. That's really not "meant" for cutting tapers. But I've seen blocks of known angles clamped to it and it used that way to cut tapers.

When the miter table gets here and installed (still no word if the container is actually on the boat yet), some of those angles should get easier. In the meantime, it's been measuring from the edge of the sliding table (plus the slight distance to the blade)... And doing some math to figure out the taper.

Dan, Do you mean something like the first jig I described or is there an easier/better way that you've seen? Please describe the jig you've seen and how it works. Or are you taking about something else? Camphers? Miters?

"Don't worry, I saw this work in a cartoon once."
"Usually learning skills and tooling involves a progression of logical steps."

Last edited by MAFoElffen; 06-08-2013 at 02:41 AM.
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post #4 of 31 (permalink) Old 06-08-2013, 10:43 AM
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Mikey, Wouldn't a $15.00 aluminum tapering jig work well on your slider? I use one often and have gotten pleasing results. An oversize one for your jumbo saw could easily be fashioned by a guy like you.
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post #5 of 31 (permalink) Old 06-08-2013, 11:10 AM
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You have the right idea Mike. The shop I was in was trying to make the long miters on a Unisaw and the biggest problem was the start/stop/start marks where the operator had to get a new grip. Every time you stop the tension on the blade and arbor bearings changes and the blade relaxes causing a dig. That seems to made even worse when the blade is angled. I figured out that you could avoid that using the sliding table and keep fairly even tension on the blade. The jig I made was just a stop block at either end and a fence to keep the depth fixed and then clamp it all to the slider well enough to make sure it wouldn't move. They were using Famowood to hide the gaps and using a lot of it and the few I produced only needed a small wipe to hide the hairline crack.

A couple of days later they had to lay a bunch of us off and since I was away from home I rased my hand and said "Pick me, pick me" and they did. I never had a chance to refine the jig but it worked decently as a prototype. The only real issue was keeping the workpiece from moving during the cut which shouldn't be too hard to figure out.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #6 of 31 (permalink) Old 06-08-2013, 12:17 PM
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Here is a new solution to making tapered cuts on your saw or router table with 1/8th of a degree accuracy: MicroJigs new Microdial tapering jig. You can learn more about it here:

Micro Jig | MICRODIAL Tapering Jig | The most precise, versatile tapering jig | Safety and Precision on the Tablesaw| Tapered Cuts on a Table Saw | Table Saw Cutting | GRR-RIPPER Tapering Jig | Precision Taper Jigs |
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post #7 of 31 (permalink) Old 06-08-2013, 12:21 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OPG3 View Post
Mikey, Wouldn't a $15.00 aluminum tapering jig work well on your slider? I use one often and have gotten pleasing results. An oversize one for your jumbo saw could easily be fashioned by a guy like you.
Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia
Yes, a standard TS Taper Jig is just 2 pieces connected with a hinge on one end... But if I combine what I was thinking, with what you just reminded me with (a standard ts taper jig), but make the base piece wider to fit between two crosscut fences, then with that and the fences' scales, I'd have a baseline reference to go from and be able to get back to repeatedly. It'd at least be a fast way to know were square was.

I picked up some 1-1/4x1/4" flat stock and some 1/2x1/4" flat stock to braze together for tee nuts and miter bars for the sliding table. I also picked up some 1/2" aluminum plate to build an adapter, to adapt the crosscut fence's miter coupling (gauge) to standard aluminum extrusions. After installing the positive stop miter table (which is still on the European tour*) , the crosscut fence will mount with a different coupling to that, so then that will free of that old miter coupling, to use for an accessory fence. I was thinking of picking up a Felder/Hammer 1300mm fence to use as an accessory fence... but I have all these nice aluminum extrusions here already. Might as well use them and they are probably more openly adaptable to jigs.

Notes: * - It's only been a month now. 1-1/2 to 2 months to wait still. Some parts are still arriving sporadically, but the main portion is still that long out. Otis was right. It seems longer having part of it here, waiting on other pieces to complete the package. Don't get me wrong. I'm glad the main part of it is here. But if someone gave me a gift in stages... I can see that I would be a real mess.

"Don't worry, I saw this work in a cartoon once."
"Usually learning skills and tooling involves a progression of logical steps."

Last edited by MAFoElffen; 06-08-2013 at 12:32 PM.
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post #8 of 31 (permalink) Old 06-08-2013, 12:33 PM
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post #9 of 31 (permalink) Old 06-08-2013, 05:34 PM
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Mikey, If anyone I know can do this up-right, it is you. You have the ultimate positive and repeatable (parallel to cutting direction) rig - and making a jumbo tapering jig from Aluminum Extrusions is something you can excel at. Funny thing about tapering pieces to make a "regular" frustum shape - if the pieces are all exact copies - it will ALWAYS come together. Cutting parts to make funneling polygons looks intimidating until you actually do it, then the project will seem quite easy to accomplish. Then, determination of the centroid(s) becomes quite easy - just see where corner-to-corner lines do (or will) intersect. Most people that have never done this are scared to try, but for you - it will be easy due to (darn-near perfect) repeatability.
Good luck my tater-headed friend,
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post #10 of 31 (permalink) Old 06-08-2013, 05:39 PM
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Oh yeah - one other thing: For many projects like this if you will use METRIC dimensioning (base 10 makes sense!): doing the old A squared + B squared = C squared thing gets easy enough for a first grader to easily perform.
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