Lets Talk About Re-Sawing Again - Router Forums
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-25-2014, 11:09 AM Thread Starter
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Default Lets Talk About Re-Sawing Again

The reason that I would like to bring this subject up again to ask question about re-sawing with a 1/8" blade. What I'm actulally wondering is this. Do many of you more experienced members often use a thin blade or not, and if not why not.

My limited exposure to the use of a band saw is such that what I'm learning is from what I read on this forum and my own experience.

For anybody that is not familier with my saw, it is a 17" Grizzly that I acquired a couple of years ago.

For the most part when re-sawing hard wood I use a typical one inch blade and all works well, not much to talk about other than to say the results are outstanding, couldn't ask for anything to be better. I follow Alex Snodgrass's advise just for the record.

Here's the point of this thread. This morning I did the re-saw work for the inside lining of the cedar chest project. I'm using the thin blade which, from what I have read and assumed is not the first choice of such work, but I have had such good luck with it that it has caused me to want to ask if others have had similar experience and if a reader of this thread hasn't tried the thin blade for re-sawing they might want to try it.

The first veneer that I cut, a few day ago, was for the floor of the chest. The rough cut aromatic cedar boards are approximately five inches wide and an inch thick. The inside width of the chest is 32", so I cut pieces 34" long and was able to get four cuts, or five parts out of one board. The thickness of each part is about .160", the variation in thickness of all five parts is no more than .010". The final or fifth piece did have some taper in it and was unusable for the full 32", but the first half is fine for use on a side panel Before starting the re-saw cuts the boards were run over the jointer on one face and one edge. The edge not run over the jointer was cleaned up on the TS.

When I cut the parts for the floor I did not run the face that was not run over the jointer through the planer to clean it up and this may have contributed to that last part being tapered, but by the same token, if I had planed that second face I may not have gotton the fifth piece of the board.

When I cut the lining for the sides this morning II wanted thicker material because I want to create completed panels to install in the sides, ends and the lid. I cut these boards for this purpose into thirds and planed them to about a quarter of an inch. These parts will be butte jointed before installed in the chest. When working on these parts I did run the second face through the planer.

If there was any problem worth mentioning is would that of the knots in cedar getting knocked out during the planning and leaveing a hole now and then in the resulting piece of cedar lining.

I need to say that the feed for this cutting was very slow, a full minute to a minute and a half for a 34" cut.

So, the question is about this method of re-sawing with a thin blade, is it just an every day function of re-sawing for most members or not??????

Jerry
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-25-2014, 01:22 PM
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I always go with a wide blade and as few teeth as I can find on a blade just because that is the way I always heard it should be done. Remember the rule that if it works then it is the right way. That doesn't mean it is the only way.

I bought some cedar siding from a local sawmill a few years back and I watched them process some of it. They were using a hot melt glue gun to hold/reinsert the knots. It meant a big difference to them in grade quality so it was worth having some one stand there and do it. Just apply to the side that won't show. If you are going to run through your planer you will need to smooth it flat while hot.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-26-2014, 05:56 AM
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Jerry, There is a reason you got good results with a thin (narrow) blade and that reason is the fact of cedar being a soft wood. Typically, thick (wide) blades are utilized because they can best resist the forces that will deflect the blade in a direction perpendicular to the blade's travel path. You got-away with using the thin blade because you were cutting soft wood. Resawing with a narrow blade is not recommended!

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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-26-2014, 03:05 PM
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Jerry, I have your saw's little brother, a Grizzly 14". I have successfully re-sawed narrow (3 - 4") pine using a 1/8" blade and a slow feed. For wider boards and hardwood i use a 1/2" Wood Slicer blade. The main reason being the size of the gullets. The 3-4 tpi variable tooth pitch creates big gullets that efficiently carry the sawdust out of the cut. For a wide board or hardwood, if you use a narrow blade, you'd have to slow down your feed rate significantly to try to clear the sawdust. If the gullets get clogged, or you slow down too much you'll most likely burn the wood and you might damage the blade. For a quick cut, sometimes i cheat and don't spend the time to change the blade. So far, I've been lucky. Although to me, luck in the shop means I got away with stupid. Anyway, for re-sawing hardwood, and any wood wider than 4" or so, i will take the time to put on the Wood Slicer. I'm guessing with your 17" you could go wider than my 4" limit. Don't really know since I've never used a band saw larger than 14".
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-26-2014, 04:18 PM
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I am not an expert with a band saw but it seems that if you were re-sawing harder wood there would be a heat transfer issue. I would think that repeated usage would eventually damage the blade and the wood. I always use a larger blade with plenty of space between gullets. That's my thought for what it's worth
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-26-2014, 06:59 PM
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Jerry-
I'm with Barry747--Woodslicer blade all the way! It has made a significant difference in my resawing on my very old Grizzly 14".
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-26-2014, 09:56 PM
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!/8 inch blades have a lot of teeth per inch (tpi).

Remember me posting this info to you before?
http://www.routerforums.com/367415-post15.html

You would burn up an 1/8 blade cutting thick stock. The number of teeth in the work and the size of the gullets would not allow the saw dust to get carried out. Even if it didn't overheat, then it being only 1/8 inch, the blade would wander and not cut straight enough.

You usually go down in size to cut a tighter radius. For a bigger radius (or in this case straight) and thicker material, you use a wider blade with less tooth count per inch. For resawing, I use a 1" wide 3tpi to 1-1/2 tpi blade, depending on the wood I'm cutting and how thick it is. (But I have used 3/4" blades.)

"Don't worry, I saw this work in a cartoon once."
"Usually learning skills and tooling involves a progression of logical steps."

Last edited by MAFoElffen; 07-26-2014 at 09:58 PM.
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-26-2014, 10:32 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MAFoElffen View Post
!/8 inch blades have a lot of teeth per inch (tpi).

Remember me posting this info to you before?
Router Forums - View Single Post - I Am Having Another BS Problem

You would burn up an 1/8 blade cutting thick stock. The number of teeth in the work and the size of the gullets would not allow the saw dust to get carried out. Even if it didn't overheat, then it being only 1/8 inch, the blade would wander and not cut straight enough.

You usually go down in size to cut a tighter radius. For a bigger radius (or in this case straight) and thicker material, you use a wider blade with less tooth count per inch. For resawing, I use a 1" wide 3tpi to 1-1/2 tpi blade, depending on the wood I'm cutting and how thick it is. (But I have used 3/4" blades.)

Mike,
I agree with everything you say, that is very easy to understand.

I happened to have had the thin blade on the saw due to needing it for cutting the template for the ginger bread on the project. In that it is a hassle to change blades on the saw I just wanted to see what would happen if I tried re-sawing the soft cedar before changing blades.

The re-swing went so well I just stayed with using the thin blade. The cedar being so soft, as Otis pointed out, let me get by with it this time.

I just have this unfortunate urge to share things like this with folks on the forum. I suppose that I need to think first before giving way to that urge.

I guess that as sometimes, such as this time, I made myself look rather ignorant about band saw blades. But by the same token, maybe what was said in response to the thread will be of value to somebody that needs to be reminded or educated that is new to the use of Band Saws. So, what should a person do, filter or not filter one's urge to post or start a thread when one has a new learning or discovery experience. Heck, life is to short to get serious about such little things like that isn't it.

I'll just keep being myself and posting my less than expert views and findings. Mike, you will just have to put up with me and my thinking. The fact of the matter is that your post was meant to be of help to me and I appreciate that, I just felt a bit foolish when you implied that you had gone through this with me earlier and were sort of taking me to the woodshed for not remembering. I don't think that you meant to imply that, I'm just admitting to you how it made me feel. That is my problem and it has plagued me for a long time. I'm trying to deal with it for my own sake, O.K.

Jerry

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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-26-2014, 11:57 PM
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No bad.

I also remember you having amazing results using wider, true resaw blades to cut your own walnut veneers... So I know you have done that even more accurately than I have.

With as big a job as yours is to change blades on, I too might think twice about changing blades just to make a few short cuts.

I understand that with your band saw, you end up having to take off your table just to change blades. And with the way I know your eyes work, I can see that as being a real challenge. I am thankful that my blades can be changed in my bandsaw with the table still on and it only takes a few minutes. Reading about your adventures with your saw has reminded me to remain humble and to appreciate things.

"Don't worry, I saw this work in a cartoon once."
"Usually learning skills and tooling involves a progression of logical steps."

Last edited by MAFoElffen; 07-27-2014 at 12:15 AM.
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 07-27-2014, 08:26 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MAFoElffen View Post
No bad.

I also remember you having amazing results using wider, true resaw blades to cut your own walnut veneers... So I know you have done that even more accurately than I have.

With as big a job as yours is to change blades on, I too might think twice about changing blades just to make a few short cuts.

I understand that with your band saw, you end up having to take off your table just to change blades. And with the way I know your eyes work, I can see that as being a real challenge. I am thankful that my blades can be changed in my bandsaw with the table still on and it only takes a few minutes. Reading about your adventures with your saw has reminded me to remain humble and to appreciate things.

Mike,
Just to clear something up about my vision, it in no way has anything to do with changing blades on the saw. The vision issue is just almost impossible to explain. It in no way interferes with 90 percent of what I do in the shop, I just need help when reading a tape measure, reading the marks on the primary scale of Incra TS LS, reading the dial calipers etc.

I'm doing much better in the changing the blades on the saw. The weight of the table causes the removal and reinstallation to be a bit difficult. The real PITA is getting that first bolt started in the bottom of the table that holds it in place on the trunjuns. I don't know how to spell trunjuns but you know what I mean. Once that first bolt is started the other three are no problem, but that first one is a bear for me and the only part that I dislike doing. You are right about the table having to be be removed. I have learned how to quickly adjust the thrust bearing. I can set it by feel and once set check it by turning on the saw and seeing if the bearing is not turning, if it is not turning, I turn the saw off and rotate the wheels check to see that it takes the slightest pressure on the blade for it to engage the bearing and cause it to begin to turn. The guide bearing being are easy to see and any adjustment to them is easy and often not required. The width of differenct blades is of course the reason for having to reset the thrust bearings. Tracking of the blade on the tires is done easily, I do this visually now, I used to use a dial caliper to measure the distance from the edge of the tire to the bottom of the gullet of what ever blade is being installed, but that level of accuracy does not seem to be that critical. The tires on the wheels of the saw by the way are just exactly one inch wide. In regare to blade tenion, I am not real sure yet about how to do it, so I just set it moderately tight, start the saw and slowing tighen the blade until the sound is minimal and smooth, almost quiet except for the sound of the weld. When this is done and and a re-saw attempt is dead on, I call it good. Heck, I don't know if my approach is right or not but it works for me and that is all that counts I suppose. The saw, IMHO is a great saw, but I have no way to compare it with a really high end machine.

So far, I have only used Timber Wolve blades, but would like to try some other brands but right now can't imagine another brand doing a better job, but confess that I am courious..

I recently answered a thread in which Bill asked where I had been, in my post to the question I told about my present project which is part of this thead about re-sawing of the cedar lining. Well there has been some progress on the build and cedar is now installed, I'll attach some photos of the chest and the build on this thread. I have not done the greatest job of installing the cedar lining and will do it differently the next time, so when you see the mis fit of it just remember that I am very aware of the error and my mistakes.

Jerry
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Last edited by Jerry Bowen; 07-27-2014 at 08:29 AM.
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