To snipe or not to snipe, that is the question. - Router Forums
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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-14-2014, 09:52 AM Thread Starter
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Default To snipe or not to snipe, that is the question.

So much for trying to be clever. Anyway, this problem really had me struggling for an answer. It involves a relatively new Dewalt DW734 thickness planer which I have been very happy with, until now.

I recently replaced a very old computer and old inkjet printer. My old printer lived on the floor but the new one has a small control screen that really needs to be at eye level so I figured this was an opportunity to try my hand at making a piece of furniture. I also wanted it to hold an old laser printer and have room to store paper and ink jet cartridges.

After learning that Iím lousy at making mortise and tenon joints I ended up with the table displayed in the first four pictures below. The first two while it was still in the shop, showing the table with the door closed and open. The next two with the table in place and with the printers on it.

Now for the problem. The 5th picture shows a close up of the door. The two vertical half rounds were not in the original plans. They were my wifeís suggestion to cover up the problem that is displayed in the last picture. Notice the area of darker stain on the left with a sharp dividing line between the darker and lighter area. I joined two boards to form the door front and ran the panel through the thickness planner. I ran both sides through. There was no visible snipe on the panel. After staining, the dark area appeared on both sides at about the same place. I measured the thickness of the panel in the dark and lighter areas and they were within a couple thousandths. By the way, this is the second panel with the same result. The wood is select pine from Home Depot.

Has anyone ever experienced this problem with their planner? Any idea what could be causing this? Iíve run other wood through the planner and havenít seen this, but, this is the first wood that Iíve stained. I usually use Danish Oil on pieces cut from boards run through the planner with no noticeable difference in absorption across the boards.

Iíd really appreciate any help. My next projects are going to be jewelry boxes and Iíd hate to have to run a lot of extra length to be cut off to get clean boards.
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-14-2014, 10:48 AM
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As you identified in your thread title, this is indeed planer snipe. Here's a short video about what causes snipe on lunchbox planers:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XdDo3OEtjhc

Here's a couple good ideas on how to eliminate snipe on these planers:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i6CTmgpcdTM

Here's a video about torsion boxes, as mentioned on the last video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-Hbsou6cWo

Hope this helps!

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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-14-2014, 03:21 PM
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Great videos,,, and excellent training video,

John

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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-14-2014, 10:10 PM
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If you figure it out let me know. I have had a 12 Grizzly for 20 yrs. I also have a 20" Grizzly. I just allow for snipe, it happens sometimes on the last in or so
I usually run all my boards at once so I do not worry about it. BUT I always allow for it.
But I usually run several hundred feet at a time. I just ran 150 BOARD feet which is around 300 lineal feet.
Now I have to run this once pass on each side and then one pass on the good side, so around 1000 feet.
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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-14-2014, 11:20 PM
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Fire does a helical head help at all to avoid or lessen the potential for snipe?

I donít always insulate , but when I do .
Ok ,I never insulate
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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-15-2014, 05:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RainMan1 View Post
Fire does a helical head help at all to avoid or lessen the potential for snipe?
It doesn't seem to. What helps most of all is keeping the board level on the infeed and outfeed of the job. My DW735 (and the DW733 before it) can take anything up to about 60" to 70" without enough snipe to notice. Beyond that, i use support on the infeed side and catch it on the outfeed.

I've considered building a support table--but when i thickness really long stock i just don't trim much off the ends before planing. Then if i get slow on the catch--that last few inches goes to the "i'll find something to use this for" stack...pile...hill...mountain!!

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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-15-2014, 06:53 AM
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Hi Barry,

Nice work on the table, it looks good. Also your wife has a real good eye for design, the half rounds don't just hide the problem, they really make it pop. I may have to steal that at some stage for a project!

On snipe, I like many others just leave the boards long before I use the thicknesser and also sometimes glue scrap pieces that are longer than the workpiece onto each side. That cures snipe but it is time consuming so I only do it with valuable pieces of wood that I don't want ANY waste on. Which in the UK is ANY wood other than softwood!

Keep up the good work and ask the missus for ideas, she is a natural designer!

Regards, Al
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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-15-2014, 07:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fire65 View Post
If you figure it out let me know. I have had a 12 Grizzly for 20 yrs. I also have a 20" Grizzly. I just allow for snipe, it happens sometimes on the last in or so
I usually run all my boards at once so I do not worry about it. BUT I always allow for it.
But I usually run several hundred feet at a time. I just ran 150 BOARD feet which is around 300 lineal feet.
Now I have to run this once pass on each side and then one pass on the good side, so around 1000 feet.
I have never heard that it does, all mine are normal blades. Proper out feed table is about the best you can do I think, but I was running a lot of 14' boards so I just let them run out and do not worry about snipe.
I usually end up cutting off the ends of all the boards after milling anyway.
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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-15-2014, 07:55 AM
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As clay mentioned, square and cut to length after planing seems to work for me.
And, for shorter, valuable pieces, I'll run a longer piece on either side. Although, I don't glue them.

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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-15-2014, 08:25 AM
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Fire the GI planer I'm looking at is a 15" , and the feature I like about is the lower table stays stationary ( does not change height ) as you adjust the thickness ,,as instead the upper section goes up and down . Most don't work this way , at least from what I've seen .
I thought it would be an advantage because you could have an accurate in feed and out feed table avoiding snipe as you wouldn't have to change there height. You can see the motor is mounted on top which is unusual

I was hoping to acquire this one next year if all goes well ( with helical head)
http://www.general.ca/products/1_gen...er/30-115.html

I donít always insulate , but when I do .
Ok ,I never insulate

Last edited by RainMan 2.0; 08-15-2014 at 08:31 AM.
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