Drill Press or Router table? - Router Forums
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post #1 of 27 (permalink) Old 10-12-2014, 08:34 PM Thread Starter
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Default Drill Press or Router table?

I have some birthday money left over, the problem with this is most of it is tied to home depot via a gift card. I need a router table top (Incra offset) to begin building my router table but the router I have requires me to drill a hole in the plate for the adjustment bar. I know a drill press is a great tool and it really is the only thing that I can get from home depot in regards to tools. So I am at a cross roads, should I buy the drill press first wait a month and then buy the table top or use some of the cash I have and buy the table top? If I do the latter then I really dont know what to do with the gift card from home depot.
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post #2 of 27 (permalink) Old 10-12-2014, 08:46 PM
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Micheal
You did not say how Much money you got, but HD sells hardware, lumber, alway need shop supplies.
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post #3 of 27 (permalink) Old 10-12-2014, 08:49 PM
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Originally Posted by nightdeath4223 View Post
I have some birthday money left over, the problem with this is most of it is tied to home depot via a gift card. I need a router table top (Incra offset) to begin building my router table but the router I have requires me to drill a hole in the plate for the adjustment bar. I know a drill press is a great tool and it really is the only thing that I can get from home depot in regards to tools. So I am at a cross roads, should I buy the drill press first wait a month and then buy the table top or use some of the cash I have and buy the table top? If I do the latter then I really dont know what to do with the gift card from home depot.
get a drill press a good one the table top is not necessary you can use anything for a router table good luck jack
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post #4 of 27 (permalink) Old 10-12-2014, 08:55 PM
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Originally Posted by nightdeath4223 View Post
I have some birthday money left over, the problem with this is most of it is tied to home depot via a gift card. I need a router table top (Incra offset) to begin building my router table but the router I have requires me to drill a hole in the plate for the adjustment bar. I know a drill press is a great tool and it really is the only thing that I can get from home depot in regards to tools. So I am at a cross roads, should I buy the drill press first wait a month and then buy the table top or use some of the cash I have and buy the table top? If I do the latter then I really don't know what to do with the gift card from home depot.
go with a get by DP....

Versatile Drill Guide - Lee Valley Tools



now go for the router table ...

and send me the card....

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
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post #5 of 27 (permalink) Old 10-12-2014, 09:01 PM
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A plunge router can drill holes as long as they aren't too deep and the size is common.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #6 of 27 (permalink) Old 10-12-2014, 09:20 PM Thread Starter
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go with a get by DP....




now go for the router table ...

and send me the card....
Hahahahaha that is probably best way to get all of it.
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post #7 of 27 (permalink) Old 10-12-2014, 09:23 PM Thread Starter
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Micheal
You did not say how Much money you got, but HD sells hardware, lumber, alway need shop supplies.
I have about 300 dollars in b day money.
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post #8 of 27 (permalink) Old 10-12-2014, 09:25 PM Thread Starter
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A plunge router can drill holes as long as they aren't too deep and the size is common.
Well the first hole that I need to drill through is a metal plate.
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post #9 of 27 (permalink) Old 10-12-2014, 10:21 PM
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A drill press is indispensable.
Drilling is an important part of woodworking. Fine woodworking requires jigs & fixtures. And, unlike the metal working industry, woodworking jigs & fixtures are rarely excavated (shouldered, morticed e.g.) to accommodate the location of their components. Consequently, they are screwed together. And if you can't drill, you can't make fixtures and your woodworking will be compromised.

Typically, the well fixtured woodworker does most of his critical work, (at the expense of time) before assembly and stuff just snaps together. Disregard the fixturing stage of your project and you get to the assembly much quicker. But to get your stuff together, you have to tune your way through a cascade of crap whilst using a swear word from time to time. Parts jam in their sockets, have to be sanded, hammered to fit, holes have to be overdrilled etc; you know who you are.

Knowing how to drill and make your drill press work will get you started. Knowing how to select a drill, feed rate and drill speed will expedite the experience. Getting the work clamped & immobilized, understanding the press's signature, and fixturing the press will increase your chances as a quillman. Understanding what can go wrong and what you can do about it will put you in control.

Drilling is a big deal. Making fixtures is only a fraction of it. I'm sure you'd like to get 2 pieces of material to register, drill on consistent centers, or maybe tap a little.
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post #10 of 27 (permalink) Old 10-12-2014, 11:17 PM Thread Starter
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A drill press is indispensable.
Drilling is an important part of woodworking. Fine woodworking requires jigs & fixtures. And, unlike the metal working industry, woodworking jigs & fixtures are rarely excavated (shouldered, morticed e.g.) to accommodate the location of their components. Consequently, they are screwed together. And if you can't drill, you can't make fixtures and your woodworking will be compromised.

Typically, the well fixtured woodworker does most of his critical work, (at the expense of time) before assembly and stuff just snaps together. Disregard the fixturing stage of your project and you get to the assembly much quicker. But to get your stuff together, you have to tune your way through a cascade of crap whilst using a swear word from time to time. Parts jam in their sockets, have to be sanded, hammered to fit, holes have to be overdrilled etc; you know who you are.

Knowing how to drill and make your drill press work will get you started. Knowing how to select a drill, feed rate and drill speed will expedite the experience. Getting the work clamped & immobilized, understanding the press's signature, and fixturing the press will increase your chances as a quillman. Understanding what can go wrong and what you can do about it will put you in control.

Drilling is a big deal. Making fixtures is only a fraction of it. I'm sure you'd like to get 2 pieces of material to register, drill on consistent centers, or maybe tap a little.
The more that I read the more I believe you are absolutely correct, I guess my issue is from being excited to finally have one of the major tools (table saw) to do work. In that excitement I am leaning on getting the router table taking care of so I can then start doing things. But I agree, being over excited and moving quick, especially for a novice, is not a wise thing when I have a bookcase and ent center coming up.
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