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post #1 of 20 (permalink) Old 11-12-2014, 02:53 PM Thread Starter
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Default Barn Wood Picture Frames

I took a project and its different than anything I've done before thus I'm looking for thoughts and suggestions about how to proceed.

My customer lost her grandparents who were farmers. In the settlement of their estate the property went on the auction block and the buyer choose to tear down the house and barn. As a last minute thought she decided she'd 'salvage' some barn pieces for a memento. She asked me to make 3 - 5 x 7 picture frames from this - one for her and one each for her two siblings.

I've made my share of picture frames but they were always with nice stock, straight with parallel edges. Even if it was re-purposed it's been good stock.

As you can see I've begun to layout how I can get the pieces I need. To be successful I need to keep as much of the "natural" edge as I can. The two things I'm most concerned about is not having a nice edge to place against a fence to cut miters and having the corners reasonably meet up.

Thanks for reading and giving this some thought.
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post #2 of 20 (permalink) Old 11-12-2014, 03:46 PM
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Berry I recently did something similar to your project using aged wood for a rustic look. I ripped my stock keeping in mind to have has much "Old-Barn" wood on the soon to be outside of the frame. That way when assembled the frame looks old or in your case painted barn wood. For the inside of the frame where it was ripped I brought the image up and flush with the frame. If that is not possible mixing some paint(s) to match the barn wood is something to consider.
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post #3 of 20 (permalink) Old 11-12-2014, 04:05 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the reply Jim, did you re-enforce those corners in some way or is it just glue?

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post #4 of 20 (permalink) Old 11-12-2014, 04:20 PM
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I have seen a sled/clamp on Youtube that you could use to cut a straight edge and keep the natural edge.

Will see if I can find it again.

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post #5 of 20 (permalink) Old 11-12-2014, 04:43 PM
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Along with glue, I believe I used a 1 1/2 inch wide crown staple gun that sunk them below flush. If I didn't have the gun I thought about using dowels and putting the aging/weather mix of vinegar and steel wool

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post #6 of 20 (permalink) Old 11-12-2014, 06:03 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jw2170 View Post
I have seen a sled/clamp on Youtube that you could use to cut a straight edge and keep the natural edge.

Will see if I can find it again.
That's okay, I have a sled like that somewhere in the garage. I'll have to get up into the joists and see if I can find it. Thanks.

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post #7 of 20 (permalink) Old 11-12-2014, 06:12 PM
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Not much extra wood. Develop a good plan before starting. I think 45 miters is good since it will keep the most original edges exposed. Vinegar and steel wool (use 0000) will make a good stain to do the edges and blemishes that show fresh cut wood. Let the steel wool sit in the vinegar for days, so it gets good and dark. The mitered corners will need some additional strength. If you can do dowels accurately you can do this with small diameter dowels, The staple from the back side will work well if you have the right stapler to do this. A triangle of thin craft plywood like maybe 1/16 thick on the back side of each corner, stained with the steel wool/vinegar, is another way. Position them back away from the outside edge of the frame to make them less visible from the front.

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post #8 of 20 (permalink) Old 11-12-2014, 08:13 PM
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Our house was built in about 1920, and when we replaced the windows several years ago, i saved the original jambs in a pile behind the shed. My wife recently had a family picture printed on 24" x 36" canvas, which was mounted to a 1 1/4" thick cardboard like backer. Her intent was to hang with no frame. I made a quick outer frame of 3/4" poplar, then straight-lined some of the old jambs on my home-made straight line jig. Had about 66" in length, so i cut 2 1/4" from each edge on the straight line jig. On each of the 66" long pieces, i marked the location for miter cuts to keep as close to continuous grain as i could. With that much width, i was able to simply pocket screw the corners to show her my idea (no glue at all). Picture below doesn't do it justice, and she loves it just like it is. (in the photo, the frame is just laid over the picture so she could see it--but the fit was spot on.) By doing it that way, the outer edge is still natural and weathered, as James mentioned.
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post #9 of 20 (permalink) Old 11-12-2014, 09:52 PM
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Yes, Earl. That was the jig I had in mind...

Here are a couple;

Build a Taper Jig for the Table Saw - YouTube

Multi Function Table Saw Hold Down Jig - 136 - YouTube

Table Saw Jointer and Tapering Jig - YouTube

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post #10 of 20 (permalink) Old 11-13-2014, 07:58 AM
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Don't know if this will help or is even in the same ballpark as what you're needing.
Cutting on the Band Saw without a Straight Reference Edge | Woodsmith Tips
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