Considering getting an air compressor to nail (or grap?) something. - Router Forums
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post #1 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-06-2015, 08:13 PM Thread Starter
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Default Considering getting an air compressor to nail (or grap?) something.

Hi, the specific use I would give to this nail gun, is to nail a 1/2" MDF board to a 1.5"x1.5"x1.5" cube of pine together.

Once Stick told me something about the different "nails" that exist, not sure what kind of air compressor would be good for this, and if maybe an electric nail gun could be better.

I never used one, no idea really.
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post #2 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-06-2015, 08:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Artemix View Post
Hi, the specific use I would give to this nail gun, is to nail a 1/2" MDF board to a 1.5"x1.5"x1.5" cube of pine together.

Once Stick told me something about the different "nails" that exist, not sure what kind of air compressor would be good for this, and if maybe an electric nail gun could be better.

I never used one, no idea really.
MDF is dense... go with air...
what pins/nails do you have in mind....
what guns are available to you???

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
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post #3 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-06-2015, 09:15 PM
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The common ones here are : 23 gauge- almost invisible but usually limited to about 35 mm length unless you want to spend a lot more and get one that goes 50mm. 18 gauge is the most popular, small hole, commonly available to 50mm length. 16 gauge is for nailing heavy trim work like base boards onto drywall.

It doesn't take a very large compressor to run one but you do need a regulator on it to control output pressure. That's what determines how deep the nails get driven.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #4 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-06-2015, 09:22 PM
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MDF might curl pin nails, the longer the pin the easier it'll curl. 15 to maybe 18 gauge might work. I know of one or 2 Lumb yds, in my area that would/could let a possible purchaser test one of their guns on a piece of 3/4 MDF. You might try asking one near you (especially if they have their own cabinet shop).

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post #5 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-06-2015, 09:38 PM Thread Starter
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What is the gauge you are using to measure the gun?.
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post #6 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-06-2015, 09:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Artemix View Post
What is the gauge you are using to measure the gun?.
it's the size/dia of the pins/nails....


This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #7 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-07-2015, 12:36 AM
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Something that may also be confusing is that the larger the gauge, the smaller the diameter. 23 gauge is smaller than 18 gauge which is smaller than 16 gauge. With sheet metal, the gauge number is supposed to be the number of sheets that will make a stack 1" thick. The nails are probably the same.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #8 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-07-2015, 08:01 AM
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I use 18 ga for just about all trim work. I've had two brad guns, and both required between 70 to 100 PSI to operate properly. Anything less will leave the brad head standing proud. Keep that in mind when looking at compressors. A tiny desktop version might not be strong enough.
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post #9 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-07-2015, 08:21 AM
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Thanks for the info Stick486.
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post #10 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-07-2015, 08:24 AM
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I often use my 30 pound Porter Cable pancake compressor for the 18ga nails. It will probably do any size as it's a 6 gallon unit @ 150 psig max though only 70-100 psig is needed for the brad nailer. Lowe's (Shop PORTER-CABLE 0.8-HP 6-Gallon 150-PSI 120-Volt Pancake Electric Air Compressor at Lowes.com ) has them on sale for about a hundred bucks though unfortunately in Canada they will be more. I also use that little compressor for other small jobs in the garage - pumping tires up, blowing water out of nooks and crannies of our RV's fresh water system, etc. My big compressor - well let's say that wheeling a couple hundred pounds out to nail a couple pieces of wood together can get tough on this ancient body.

An electric nailer or stapler just wont do the job IMO. I've had at least 3 staplers and all have died horrible deaths. There just isn't room to put a big enough solenoid in a reasonable size housing

Dave W

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Last edited by IC31; 01-07-2015 at 08:28 AM.
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