Pipe Clamps - Router Forums
 3Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-11-2015, 03:47 PM Thread Starter
Moderation Team
 
MT Stringer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Mike
Posts: 5,680
 
Default Pipe Clamps

I have an assortment of 1/2 inch diameter pipe clamps. I use them a lot for all sorts of clamping situations.

Recently, I got to thinking about how to maximize what I have so they can be used in more situations.

So, I started looking around for a pipe threader and asked questions on other websites. Someone mentioned using conduit couplings instead of regular pipe couplings. Hmmm...

After more discussion and some old fashioned research (I went to the store), I confirmed the threads are compatible. The main reason for using a rigid steel conduit coupling is it is thinner. That will work for me.

I bought a 1/2 dozen of the couplings at $1.31 ea. Now I have more options for the lengths needed for clamping situations as they arise. The thing to do is use you shorter piece on the end with the crank handle. Makes it easy to take advantage of the longer piece.

I still want to find a threader...maybe ebay...someday.

Here's a tip. If you need more pipe for your clamps, buy a 10 foot piece at the big box store and have them cut it and thread the pieces. I checked, and you can too. Ten foot 1/2 inch black pipe is $10.88 at my local store. Sitting in the rack next to it is a four foot piece marked $9.88 ...well, duh. That is a no brainer. Had I been more attentive over the years, I think I could have saved well over $50 just by buying a long stick and having them cut it and thread the ends.

1 ten foot stick = 2 @36, 2 @ 24 inches. Or...
2 @ 48, 1 @ 24. The 24 and one 48 would be free! :-)

Here are some pics of my clamps in action. I have some 18 inchers, 24, 36, 48, and 60's. With the couplings, I can make almost any length I need.
Mike
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	2013-10-16 20.36.37.jpg
Views:	145
Size:	94.0 KB
ID:	85881  

Click image for larger version

Name:	2014-06-16 21.15.24.jpg
Views:	103
Size:	116.6 KB
ID:	85889  

Click image for larger version

Name:	2014-07-28 19.56.13.jpg
Views:	99
Size:	122.7 KB
ID:	85897  

Click image for larger version

Name:	2014-12-01 19.14.02.jpg
Views:	93
Size:	120.3 KB
ID:	85905  

Click image for larger version

Name:	2014-12-02 14.00.10.jpg
Views:	96
Size:	140.5 KB
ID:	85913  

Click image for larger version

Name:	2014-12-02 14.00.20.jpg
Views:	92
Size:	142.2 KB
ID:	85921  

Click image for larger version

Name:	2015-01-05 18.28.12.jpg
Views:	91
Size:	118.5 KB
ID:	85929  

Click image for larger version

Name:	2015-01-05 18.21.46.jpg
Views:	105
Size:	131.9 KB
ID:	85937  

Click image for larger version

Name:	2015-01-05 18.22.05.jpg
Views:	100
Size:	137.4 KB
ID:	85945  

Click image for larger version

Name:	2015-01-05 18.30.20.jpg
Views:	122
Size:	135.3 KB
ID:	85953  


That's my story and I'm stickin' to it!
MT Stringer is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-11-2015, 03:56 PM
Moderation Team
 
Cherryville Chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Country: Canada
First Name: Charles
Posts: 15,618
 
Default

Good tip about the conduit coupling. I bought my son a threading set off eBay and it was$200 Mike. You would be better off to just pay to have it done.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
Cherryville Chuck is offline  
post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-11-2015, 06:22 PM
Official Greeter
 
jw2170's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Country: Australia
First Name: James
Posts: 18,457
 
Send a message via Skype™ to jw2170
Default

Mike, do you buy the tubing already threaded?

I bought some pipe to make clamps and nearly killed myself trying run the dies on the pipe...

James
Sydney, Australia
.

I don't mind if other members disagree with my comments.
I don't profess to know everything, and I may learn something new.

"Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity."




jw2170 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-11-2015, 06:50 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Country: Canada
First Name: Al
Posts: 428
 
Default

Like all your advice,good,practical advice we can all benifit from.i have used the cast unions and they have got in the way and marked my work.i will be looking for these
Thanks Mike
al m is offline  
post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-11-2015, 07:00 PM
Registered User
 
DaninVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Country: Canada
First Name: Dan
Posts: 14,474
 
Default

James; the electrical ridgid conduit and/or black iron both com with both ends threaded. It's only when you start breaking it down that the unthreaded ends show up.
Mike's description didn't cover the point of exactly what your maximum working length will be .
A 24" piece of pipe will probably only give you 18" or less of clamping space, after you deduct the thread at one end (plus a bit extra for the screw mechanism, plus a bunch of lost room at the other end for the sliding portion.
So in reality, a 10' length might only yield a pair of 5 footers...perfect for 4' panels.
Those broken down into 2X30" per 5' length should cover the 2' gable requirement...but I'd be a lot more comfortable with 36" clamps.
Bottom line, check your actual clamps for their individual space needs!
DaninVan is offline  
post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-11-2015, 08:17 PM Thread Starter
Moderation Team
 
MT Stringer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Country: United States
First Name: Mike
Posts: 5,680
 
Default

I have several pieces that have been cut in half so one end doesn't have threads. That's one reason for looking for a threader.

@James, your comment isn't the first one I have heard about threading with a hand held threader. I think if I need more pipe, I will get it cut and threaded at the store...even if it is a small charge. Otherwise, I might put out a shout to my friends on the fishing forum I am on. Many of them are in my area, so I might get lucky. :-)

Those shorter pieces are used for gluing up cutting boards, drawer stock and assembly operations that are not very large.

I know the black pipe is cheaper, but I don't like it. I guess I could buy a cover for a shower curtain and cut it up in pieces so it would cover the glue joints. <-Tip

That's my story and I'm stickin' to it!
MT Stringer is offline  
post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-11-2015, 11:18 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Country: United States
First Name: John
Posts: 44
 
Default

I've had good luck threading the occasional pipe with this: 1/2 in. - 1 in. Ratcheting Pipe Threader Set

Not professional quality, but does the job adequately- even ran a leak proof natural gas line extension using this.
jdonhowe is offline  
post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-11-2015, 11:43 PM
Registered User
 
DaninVan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Country: Canada
First Name: Dan
Posts: 14,474
 
DaninVan is offline  
post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-12-2015, 04:29 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Country: United States
First Name: Ken
Posts: 1,145
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jdonhowe View Post
I've had good luck threading the occasional pipe with this: 1/2 in. - 1 in. Ratcheting Pipe Threader Set

Not professional quality, but does the job adequately- even ran a leak proof natural gas line extension using this.
Looks like the regular price on that is $29.99, but Harbor Freight frequently has 20% off coupons available. That would make the threader set a real bargain.
kklowell is offline  
post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-12-2015, 07:30 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Country: Brazil
First Name: sid
Posts: 558
 
Default

Very handy hint!
Sid
ksidwy is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Pads for my pipe clamps. papasombre Jigs and Fixtures 5 12-05-2014 11:28 PM
Pittsburgh 3/4 Inch Heavy Duty Pipe Clamps Gaia Tools and Woodworking 9 03-04-2012 04:01 AM
Availibility Of 3/4 Inch Pipe Clamps In The UK Gaia Tools and Woodworking 0 02-28-2012 04:55 AM
pipe clamps mah Tools and Woodworking 44 02-17-2012 08:08 AM
PVC Pipe Holes morbious Tools and Woodworking 3 02-15-2008 04:50 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome