New Blade for Ridgid 4510 - Router Forums
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-23-2015, 05:55 PM Thread Starter
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Default New Blade for Ridgid 4510

I am interested in buying a thin kerf blade for the saw. However I can't find any information as to whether the riving knife will be a problem. I assume that the factory supplied knife is matched to a standard thickness blade. I would appreciate any information or suggestions. I contacted Ridgid and was told that if the blade is thinner than the knife I'm out of luck. Anyone have suggestions or ideas?
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-23-2015, 06:47 PM
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Artie if you don't have a caliper I suggest you get one so that you can measure it. You can buy digital ones on sale for around $12-15. If I remember correctly, most thin kerf blades are .098". Calipers are handy for a whole bunch of jobs from setting bit and blade height to measuring from the miter slot to the blade to check squareness.
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-24-2015, 09:50 AM
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I bought a Bosch TS last year and found the same general disclaimer regarding the thin kerf. I decided to just stick with the standard kerf. The only compelling reasons for switching that I could find were reducing the load on the motor and reducing the waste produced by a thicker cut. Since I don't use my saw every day for hours at a time, I decided that threat to the motor was one I could live with. Is there more to the thin kerf issue than I am aware of? If so maybe I need to take another look at it.
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-24-2015, 09:56 AM
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The riving knife is there to simply keep the two pieces of wood from coming together immediately after the blade. Most riving knives that I have seen are pointed on the front end, the end that first touches the wood. If this is the case on your riving knife there shouldn't be a problem if the knife is a bit larger than the cut. The knife will simply spread the wood as it goes through the two pieces. In hard woods it might require a little more effort on the feed but on soft woods I doubt you'll notice any difference.

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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-24-2015, 01:45 PM
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A thin kerf blade will take slightly less power to drive and it turns less wood into sawdust but not very much in either case. How many teeth are on the blade makes more of a difference. The more teeth the more power you need. A thin kerf rip blade with about 18 teeth will be the fastest cutting blade you can use. I have a Freud I've used a lot and it leaves a pretty smooth cut but sometimes it helps to use blade stabilizers.

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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-24-2015, 05:47 PM
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I have the Ridgid 4512 and have been using thin kerf blades most of the time with no issues. Not sure if any differences in the riving knife between the two models?
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-28-2015, 01:55 AM
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The part number for the stock Rigid 4210 Riving knife is 089037004708. On the knife itself, it says .090 inch. So it is the thickness of a thin-kerf riving knife.

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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-28-2015, 09:18 AM
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Mike is right .090 should work with most thin kerf 10" blades.

Don't force a larger riving knife to become a wedge, and force the kerf apart... nothing good will come of that!

This becomes a problem when using smaller blades. I frequently use a 7 1/4 or 8 inch really thin blade(about .067"). Works well but not compatible with most riving knives. But, with many of the small pieces I use, it really reduces stock waste. I like CMT blades for this purpose.

For most other general purpose cutting on larger stock, I use a Freud 50 tooth combo blade. Sometimes full 1/8" kerf sometimes thin kerf. With modern blades, I don't see much if any difference in cut quality. 24 years or so ago thin kerf blades had noticeable runout/wobble issues. Don't really see that any more as long as you buy a reasonable quality blade.

The riving knife should be several(maybe 10) thousands narrower than the kerf.

A short fence will really help with the kickback issue when a riving knife can't be used. The wood won't bind where there is no fence to trap it!

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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 03-30-2015, 06:22 PM Thread Starter
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Default Thin Kerf blade question

Thanks to all for your quick and useful answers. I haven't had much time in my shop, 1/2 of garage, since this is tax season and I'm tied up in the office. I think I'll stick with the standard 1/8 blade since consensus is that for the occasional user like myself there won't be much if any difference.

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