from this to that, how? - Router Forums
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post #1 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-16-2015, 07:28 AM Thread Starter
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This; is a plank of rough sawn sapele, 120mm x 20mm x 1.5 metres.
That; is sanded smooth strips of sapele around 10mm thick x 90mm wide x 200mm long

(ok, in american, thats approximately 6" x 3/4" x 5ft, turned into 3/8ths thick x 4" wide, 8" long).

I want to make some trinket boxes with the sapele for back and sides.

How, is what tools would you use to cut the wood down to these sizes?
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post #2 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-16-2015, 08:14 AM
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There's more than one way to skin a cat, as they say.

The fast machine way: table saw to rip the board to width, followed by a run over a jointer to clean up the saw marks. Then a few passes through a planer-thicknesser to reduce the thickness. And finally cut the parts to length with a chop saw.

I wonder if it would be worth trying to reduce the thickness of the board by re-sawing instead of planing. You'd need a decent-sized band saw for that. I'm not sure if it's worth it to take 10mm off the thickness. If I had a bandsaw I'd probably give it a go though, because I hate to waste anything, and the thin piece of excess material that'd be re-sawn off could be useful for making internal trays/dividers or something like that.

The hand tool way: use a rip saw to rip the board to width, and a bench plane to make the cut edge straight, square and smooth. For a 1.5m board this is not too much work, it wouldn't take too long. You could even do it with a cross-cut saw but it'll take a bit longer.
Reduce the thickness with a scrub plane followed by a smoothing plane. This bit sounds like a lot of work to me!
Cut parts to length with a tenon saw, and use a plane on a shooting board to clean and square up the cut ends. If you're very good with the tenon saw you might not need the shooting board, but I always do.

I don't have any of the machines I described in the first way, but I'm also too lazy to do everything the second way, in particular the thicknessing. So personally, I'd find a local timber merchant and pay them to rip the board to width and plane it to thickness, then take it home and do the cross cuts by hand.
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Last edited by AndyL; 04-16-2015 at 08:17 AM.
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post #3 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-16-2015, 08:50 AM
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I would probably rip it close to the finished thickness like Andy suggested. With a 10" saw you can rip 3" from either side. Then, with the tools you have, I would put a router on skis or a sled and use it to get the finished thickness. You'll still need to do a little planing or sanding to get the boards smooth.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #4 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-16-2015, 09:24 AM
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It looks like you have a bandsaw but maybe not big enough to resaw it to thickness AND rip it to 4"...? If yes, I would use the bandsaw. You would have to sand the face, of course. If you resaw, make sure you have a fence tall enough to accommodate and check your tension and guides. Put a practice piece through first to ensure you are happy with the results. Feed slow and steady for best results. Make sure also that your blade is appropriate for resawing (3-4 teeth, 1/2" blade at least, good and sharp). If you decide to resaw, do the whole piece first then cut down to size...

If you have a split fence on your router table you could then offset the outfeed fence and use a straight bit to clean up the edges.

A planer would be good to have...or borrow time on one...

Other than that, the manual way previously suggested or circular saw to rip down to 4".

I'm sure you'll get plenty of ideas from others...

Good luck

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post #5 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-16-2015, 09:33 AM Thread Starter
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Andy, option 3 looks favourite. (lmao)

option 1 is a BIG problem. dont have a planer or thicknesser or a jointer.
I'm very new to this wood stuff, and what tools I have are extremely basic, in all senses of that word.
I'm trying to learn, honest.

I have a small table saw (kinda) that will cut up to 60mm. I'm thinking making the sides in two horizontal strips? would the glue joint look awful?
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post #6 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-16-2015, 09:43 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nickp View Post
It looks like you have a bandsaw but maybe not big enough to resaw it to thickness AND rip it to 4"...? If yes, I would use the bandsaw. You would have to sand the face, of course. If you resaw, make sure you have a fence tall enough to accommodate and check your tension and guides. Put a practice piece through first to ensure you are happy with the results. Feed slow and steady for best results. Make sure also that your blade is appropriate for resawing (3-4 teeth, 1/2" blade at least, good and sharp). If you decide to resaw, do the whole piece first then cut down to size...

If you have a split fence on your router table you could then offset the outfeed fence and use a straight bit to clean up the edges.

A planer would be good to have...or borrow time on one...

Other than that, the manual way previously suggested or circular saw to rip down to 4".

I'm sure you'll get plenty of ideas from others...

Good luck
Nick, the bandsaw I have is not up to this task. My normal way of thinking would be to cut the lengths first, then the width and depth, but I can see from these replies I'm going at it arse upwards.
I appear to be on my own on this island as far as hobby woodworking is concerned. Its a very small island, less than a half dozen shops all told that sell woodworking tools, and most of them are industrial grade machines, not much good for my little work room.

I really need to rethink this. I might have to consider a bandsaw upgrade for my birthday next month. I shall have to find out what the shipping would be from the UK for a better bandsaw.
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post #7 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-16-2015, 10:34 AM
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Are you sure your bandsaw isn't good enough? Resawing a 4" board isn't that challenging. The only problem I see with that is the saw kerf and sanding will cost you some thickness so you'll likely wind up with something like 8 mm. That's still pretty good for a hardwood like sapele.
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post #8 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-16-2015, 10:55 AM
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Bob; wouldn't buying from Italy be closer and cheaper? Some decent tools made there.
In answer to your joint question, It'd be difficult to make the joint disappear, but if you slipped in a small strip of a contrasting wood, ie dark light dark, you could make the transition a design feature rather than a problem.
Or, after you've done it the way you meant, you could do something similar with inlay at the joint, all the way around. Maybe banding?
Something like these?
Inlay Banding for Furniture and Flooring
Learn How to Make Decorative Inlay Banding From Wood - Video

Making those should keep you out of the taverna...
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post #9 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-16-2015, 11:09 AM
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I'm with Phil...resawing a 4" piece could be done on a small bandsaw by cutting it a bit thicker and then sanding down to your desired thickness.

...but more tools is always nice...

Nick

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post #10 of 19 (permalink) Old 04-16-2015, 11:12 AM
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You can resaw on the table saw, cutting from both edges, and using a tall facing on the fence. Cut partway through so that you leave a narrow uncut section in the middle and then finish the cut with handsaw (or your bandsaw if it will handle the height). You'll lose the thickness of the saw kerf but, as mentioned before, will wind up with a second board that's about 6 mm thick.

- Cut a straight edge on the board and then rip to give the widest finished width.
- Add the tall face to your TS fence, set the blade height to somewhat less than half of the width and make the first cut. Flip the board end for end so that the same face is against the fence and make the second cut - use of featherboard(s) is required for this operation.
- Cut the narrow section to give the two boards - this can be done with a handsaw or on your bandsaw if it has the height capacity. The kerf from the table saw should be wider than that of your bandsaw so you have some wiggle room while cutting.
- Plane the ridge in the center of the boards and sand to finish.

Tom
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