How does white Gorilla glue compare to titebond glue - Page 2 - Router Forums
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post #11 of 32 (permalink) Old 03-23-2016, 08:45 AM
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I use TBIII to glue cork rings for fishing rod grips- no problems in 8 years.

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post #12 of 32 (permalink) Old 03-23-2016, 09:43 AM
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I've used them both and the only difference is the gorilla glue takes longer to dry. When I use the gorilla I just leave the clamps on either all day or overnight, whereas Titebond can be unclamped sooner.

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post #13 of 32 (permalink) Old 03-23-2016, 09:45 AM
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Interesting discussion. I have had good results against hardening by storing my glues in a small igloo cooler, summer & winter. Makes it easy to find too for us old guys that can't remember where we put stuff. lol
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post #14 of 32 (permalink) Old 03-23-2016, 10:49 AM
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Polyurethane glues have their use but I recall reading a magazine test that showed PVAs have considerably better strength. As note above Gorilla sells both PVA and PU but when someone says "Gorilla Glue" I think they are talking about PU.

PU cures due to exposure to water so you can accelerate it's curing by wetting the workpieces - I've used a mister. Humidity is what kills PU in a bottle. To slow down a PU bottle from going bad, you can store it in a ziploc freezer bag which reduces the (but doesn't eliminate) the moisture getting to the glue.

Frankly, I hate PU and avoid for the most part. It's so easy to use too much and get massive squeeze (expand) out which gets on everything, even Herbs fingers! (mine, too). The one place where it makes sense is gap filling. But even then, it's not a very cleanly filled gap with all the bubbles and it doesn't sand or paint well so it's best if it's used where the seam isn't visible. Those expanding-foam-insulation-in-a-can products are PU formulations. It's handy for that!

White vs Yellow is kind of a blackhole of discussion. As I understand it, there is some correlation between yellow glue using modified aliphatic resins though the color is just dye. You could, in theory, have white MAR glue. The MAR glues are supposed to have higher initial tack and soften at higher temperature than non-MAR. Unfortunately, there is so much semi-conflicting info out there. I've had good luck with TB II and TB III so I'm sticking with them.
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post #15 of 32 (permalink) Old 03-23-2016, 11:04 AM
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I use Gorilla white but not for outside work, I'm pretty sure the creamy look came from water absorbed into unprotected wood and below the glue line. Sorta like cup rings on the coffee table.

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post #16 of 32 (permalink) Old 03-23-2016, 11:55 AM
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"To slow down a PU bottle from going bad, you can store it in a ziploc freezer bag which reduces the (but doesn't eliminate) the moisture getting to the glue. "
Silica gel can be your friend here. Double bag zip locks with silica gel in the first bag, glue bottles in the inner bag. SG can be reheated and reused indefinitely 200°F for an hour. The blue indicators turn pink and then it is time to reheat.

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post #17 of 32 (permalink) Old 03-23-2016, 02:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhilBa View Post

The one place where it makes sense is gap filling. But even then, it's not a very cleanly filled gap with all the bubbles and it doesn't sand or paint well so it's best if it's used where the seam isn't visible. Those expanding-foam-insulation-in-a-can products are PU formulations. It's handy for that!
Phil PU glues are not for filling gaps. Gorilla's website says to use their epoxy to fill gaps, that joints where PU is used must be tight fitting. Although the foam will fill gaps it has no strength as it is mostly just air bubbles. One item I read said that the foaming action helps to drive the glue into the wood grain, improving the bond in a tight fitting joint. For any loose fitting joints LV 202GF, the Titebond that has the highest solids content, or an epoxy with filler should be used. Titebond's website has a chart that shows the different properties of the 3 types.

BTW, I just bought a gallon of white glue made by Titebond that dries clear and is probably meant to go against Weldbond. I only paid $15 for the gallon. I haven't used it yet so can't make comments on it but I'm sure it will perform adequately.
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post #18 of 32 (permalink) Old 03-23-2016, 04:41 PM
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if you want gap filler and major strong...
PU adhesive as in PL Premium..
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post #19 of 32 (permalink) Old 03-23-2016, 05:32 PM
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Phil PU glues are not for filling gaps. Gorilla's website says to use their epoxy to fill gaps, that joints where PU is used must be tight fitting. Although the foam will fill gaps it has no strength as it is mostly just air bubbles. One item I read said that the foaming action helps to drive the glue into the wood grain, improving the bond in a tight fitting joint. For any loose fitting joints LV 202GF, the Titebond that has the highest solids content, or an epoxy with filler should be used. Titebond's website has a chart that shows the different properties of the 3 types.

BTW, I just bought a gallon of white glue made by Titebond that dries clear and is probably meant to go against Weldbond. I only paid $15 for the gallon. I haven't used it yet so can't make comments on it but I'm sure it will perform adequately.
Thanks Chuck; I use some Weldbond on small projects where strength isn't an issue. It may be strong but I am not sure. Weldbond is hard to find and cost a lot. Let us know how you like TB white glue.

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post #20 of 32 (permalink) Old 03-23-2016, 05:53 PM
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Store polyurethane glue in the refrigerator - extends bottle life considerably (more than a year on my current one). May form a crust on the surface, but if you break through, the glue is good. Also great for sticking soles back onto shoes and sneakers - handles the flexing when walking or running, and is "waterproof."
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I just bought a 1/2gal. of TB II "Premium" to try out. It is yellow and thick, and seems to set faster. Don't know what the premium stands for, but it was new so thought I would try it.Doesn't seem to show when dry, but drys yellow on the squeeze-out.

Herb

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