Craftsman repair facility? - Page 3 - Router Forums
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post #21 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-05-2016, 07:20 PM
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Fastenal repairs all kinds of tools. They will give an estimate before repairs. It might be cheaper to scrap it and buy an new one- another brand that has service centers.
FWIW, I don't buy from Sears for that reason, among others.

John T.
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post #22 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-05-2016, 09:31 PM
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I have had good luck with the little 12v Dewalt drill/driver/ screwdriver. Over the last four years they have had a lot of use with no problems. Batteries charge fast and last a long time.

I also have the 18V impact drill, reciprocating saw and the jig saw.They are good tools.
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post #23 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-06-2016, 11:17 AM
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@MT Stringer

I see that the 12V are LI Ion batteries.

I had/have 18V DW tools. When I stopped using them DW didn't have Li Ion batteries available. The Ni Cads were junk; no staying power, short longevity and excessive replacement cost. I could buy a charger and "one" battery cheaper then a single replacement battery. This combo was probably the most economical way to go since I had two chargers go south, also.

It has been over 10 years since I packed away the DW's. Maybe they have finally gotten their act together. A quick research on the DW batteries shows 18V Li Ion batteries are now available. They weren't when I was using mine. However, the batteries are $100-120 EA! In addition, I would have to purchase a new charger, again (replaced two previously) to charge the Li Ions!

When I made the decision to not pay for bad batteries anymore, I switched to Ryobi for lack of a better alternative at the time. I have been more then happy with their performance with the Li Ion batteries. I just purchased two Li Ion batteries for $99+tax. This is half of the price of a comparable 18V DW. I didn't need the batteries, but the ones I am using are 3-5 years old. Like DW they are only warrantied for 3 years. So, the purchase was an "anticipation" purchase.

Again, I'm not criticizing anyone who uses DW, or any other brand. I just made a decision 10 years ago not to have my wallet held hostage by poorly performing batteries. Not everyone has the finances available to own several different brands of battery powered tools, batteries, and chargers. Therefore, most of us have no knowledge base to make an informed evaluation, based on personal experience. Most will stick to one brand as a matter of economics. Since battery powered tools became prevalent, I have only owned two brands...DW and Ryobi. I made a decision to try the Ryobi's and as of yet, have not had one cause to regret it. Others will have to provide pros and cons on their Rigid's, Hitachi's, PC's or whatever.

I do not use my tools commercially
! I use them for hobby and home use only. However, they do see a lot of use. Sometimes, some VERY abusive use. I am still using my original 3/8 drill which is my first go-to tool and sees the most use. Are the Ryobi's junk? So far, I haven't seen any evidence of that. Would they hold up to commercial use? I'm not qualified to say. Am I happy with them so far? YES.

Hi, sorry I missed you. I have gone to find myself, but if I return before I get back, please ask me to wait.

Nothing ever gets built on schedule or within budget.

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post #24 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-06-2016, 11:49 AM
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Bill,
I just have to laugh at how different our Ryobi experiences have been!
Back in 1995 I bought the "top of the line" Ryobi weed eater to use on my 1 acre lawn. It started whenever it wanted to, ran terrible, and was an all around PITA. I took it back to the "Dealer" (and I use that term in jest) and they basically told me "Yea, they aren't very good". So after fighting with it every week for 3 months I took a sledge hammer to it rather than pawn it off on some other poor unsuspecting soul. I bought a Stihl, which cost more, and have run it every summer at least once a week ever since, now 21 years later. Have had several neighbors with Ryobi's come over and try my Stihl and they soon came over to the "Orange Side" as well.
Needless to say, nothing even remotely Ryobi has passed through my garage door since.
Just goes to show the difference in experiences we all have and perhaps the lack of quality control by some manufacturers.
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post #25 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-06-2016, 12:08 PM
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I recently purchased a new Milwaukee 18v brushless combo set of drill and impact which offered a choice of free circ saw, sawzall, or angle grinder. I watched a video about the new lines from them and they have invested heavily in their 12v and 18v Fuel tools. The video said that instead of making 1 or 2 motors and trying to apply it to all their tools they custom built motors for the different applications if necessary. Consequently I personally believe that Milwaukee is committed to these tools for the long haul and that I shouldn't have problems getting batteries, chargers, or parts when the time comes and I think it's that sort of (at least percieved) commitment that you should be looking for when you purchase these type tools.
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post #26 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-06-2016, 12:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by senebraskaee View Post
Bill,
I just have to laugh at how different our Ryobi experiences have been!
Back in 1995 I bought the "top of the line" Ryobi weed eater to use on my 1 acre lawn. It started whenever it wanted to, ran terrible, and was an all around PITA. I took it back to the "Dealer" (and I use that term in jest) and they basically told me "Yea, they aren't very good". So after fighting with it every week for 3 months I took a sledge hammer to it rather than pawn it off on some other poor unsuspecting soul. I bought a Stihl, which cost more, and have run it every summer at least once a week ever since, now 21 years later. Have had several neighbors with Ryobi's come over and try my Stihl and they soon came over to the "Orange Side" as well.
Needless to say, nothing even remotely Ryobi has passed through my garage door since.
Just goes to show the difference in experiences we all have and perhaps the lack of quality control by some manufacturers.
Can't fault you on the Stihl. Excellent equipment. I chose to go to Echo for mine. Still using it with no regrets.

This discussion only goes to show that, as you stated, "...just have to laugh at how different our Ryobi experiences have been!" Every brand has its outstanding stars and horrible lemons. One experience doesn't make a good or bad brand.

I have a friend that, that, like some here, is a diehard Bosch fan. Don't ask him about Bosch battery hand drills. You may not like the answer!

Again, to each his own. Most of us will stick to a certain brand because of the investment involved. I quit using several hundred dollars worth of DW tools out of shear frustration over the poor battery quality. Have they improved? I sure hope so! Do I miss my DW's...YUP! Would I dump my stable of Ryobi's to go back...? I really doubt it.

"Back in 1995 I bought the "top of the line" Ryobi weed eater to use on my 1 acre lawn. It started whenever it wanted to, ran terrible, and was an all around PITA." I have had Homelite's like that. Terrible carbs on the gas powered equipment. When I was a kid no one owned Homelite chain saws because they were unreliable.

Bottom line...do your research before you buy. Tangible and intangible costs (like battery replacements) need to be taken into consideration.

When it comes to product reviews I DON'T pay attention to the manufacturers or vendors supplied reviews. I look for real life experiences, like first hand experiences from forum members.

I think that there are a lot of tools/brands out there that will get the job(s) done. Some may be better then others but the end result is generally a job done.

Hi, sorry I missed you. I have gone to find myself, but if I return before I get back, please ask me to wait.

Nothing ever gets built on schedule or within budget.

Tool Storage Bait and Tackle, LLC.

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post #27 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-06-2016, 01:10 PM
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CC,

I too got the Milwaukee 18v brushless impact driver and drill. Great tools, IMO. Got the extra battery free and added their Multitool. Batteries last a long time and the power is unbelievable. I think I'm going to build my cordless collection on Milwaukee.

HJ
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post #28 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-06-2016, 01:27 PM
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I bought a Stihl brushcutter 30+ years ago (1982 I think?) ...I paid for it 4X over in repair costs. Very bad experience. I'm sure the new ones are just fine, but 'fool me once'.
Left it on the acreage property for the new owner; free!
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post #29 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-06-2016, 02:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaninVan View Post
I bought a Stihl brushcutter 30+ years ago (1982 I think?) ...I paid for it 4X over in repair costs. Very bad experience. I'm sure the new ones are just fine, but 'fool me once'.
Left it on the acreage property for the new owner; free!
I guess that that theme is universal. Some manufacturers are proud of their replacement parts...I won't own a Honda or a Toyota for that reason. Does that make Honda and Toyota a bad choice...nope. Millions are happy with them. However, if you have to replace or repair something the sticker shock will get you.

Are all of the manufacturers like that? In some cases, yes, just not as badly as those two brands.

I generally, do my own equipment repair. I had a piece I just couldn't get motivated to fix. Tired of tripping over it I had it worked on. The bill was not unexpected, but it was an eye opener that reinforced why I do my own work as a rule.

Not everyone had the knowledge, tools or desire to do their own equipment repair.

There was a reason why our Small Tool Repair shop at work had the 40% rule for tool repair. Sometimes you just have to cut your losses and run.

Hi, sorry I missed you. I have gone to find myself, but if I return before I get back, please ask me to wait.

Nothing ever gets built on schedule or within budget.

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post #30 of 39 (permalink) Old 06-06-2016, 05:17 PM
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I had the same experience as Dan with my Stihl weedwhacker. It never did run right. However, I have 5 of their chainsaws which all of got used logging at some point and they all ran great until they started adding ethanol into our gas. As happy as I am with the saws I don't think I'll buy another trimmer from them.
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