Help with a treadmill motor controller - Router Forums
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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 06-17-2016, 08:30 AM Thread Starter
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Default Help with a treadmill motor controller

Hi all

I have acquired a treadmill, and taken it all apart, and I want to be able to control the speed of the motor using a potentiometer, rather then using the control panel. From this I am then hoping to put it to use in a machine.

I have a basic understanding of electronics, but I was slightly stumped when my controller used an Ethernet cable to the panel rather than a few wires.

I have attached a labelled photo of the controller, and hopefully someone can point out where about I need to put the potentiometer.

The treadmill was a J6F Tunturi treadmill, with a 130VDC motor. From prior research it appears it is likely to be controlled by PWM, but I am not sure.

Thanks for any help!
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 06-17-2016, 09:17 AM
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Welcome to the forum Matthew. I think your going to have a hard time getting a good answer to this one . I'm thinking your going to use it for a stationary belt sander ?

I think your going to need a schematic to get a better understanding of how the circuit works

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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 06-17-2016, 10:18 AM
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Found this on a home brew site,

"Go cheap look for a used 1, 1 1/2 or 2 HP threadmill motor as they come up as failed weight loss items even curbside finds. These motors have a LED shutter wheel for constant rpm control no matter the motor torque demanded.
This with the electronic set speed control panel you can build a solid rpm controlled high HP mill motor rather cheap or even free. These motors also have a flywheel with the fan as a cast unit plus poly belt drive. Run this to a jackshaft then to the mill removing mill bushing radial side loading, LoveJoy direct coupling. Function before money and beauty, JMO."


I dont think you will manage to make it work from a simple pot. controller.

So, when is the first batch of white lightning gonna be ready?
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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 06-17-2016, 10:28 AM
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Hi Matt and welcome. I would agree with Bob about the pot control. Too many circuits dependent on one another. Why not just take the control switch and add some wire so you can put it where you want and leave the rest alone?

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 06-17-2016, 11:52 AM
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welcome to the forums Matt...

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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 06-17-2016, 12:01 PM
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Welcome to the forum, Matt. I think Charles has the easiest answer.

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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 06-17-2016, 12:16 PM
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It doesn't sound like you're going to be able to replicate the signaling coming out of the panel buttons with a potentiometer.

Maybe the answer will be in starting at the DC motor and collecting the parts and circuitry necessary to control the motor (brand new circuitry).

I'm assuming you're looking to keep the functions of the controller like speed and load control...?

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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 06-17-2016, 02:26 PM Thread Starter
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Hi

The issue with just using the control panel is that it brings up a lot of errors due to issues such as the incline motor not being attached. I suspect that I may have to follow Nickp's advice and build up from the motor, discarding the board.
My understanding was that there was a small voltage sent from the control panel to the motor control bit that altered the PWM with the change in voltage. Therefore a potentiometer could easily control this voltage. Although it seems the model I have may not be so simple.

Thanks
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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 06-17-2016, 03:13 PM
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So go ahead and reconnect the incline motor. That doesn't mean you have to use it. It's possible you would just need to replicate the resistance in the circuit but I'm certainly no expert.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 06-18-2016, 12:57 AM
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The problem will be speed control. On the motor itself is there a little metal disc with perforations around the edge of it, and a small arm with a magnet hanging over it? If so, that is the optical speed controller. As the motor spins, the gaps in that disc create magnetic pulses which are counted by the PCB. This is why you need the ethernet cable.When you change the speed control, the motor voltage is changed untill the magnet counts the number of pulses that the PCB is calling for, and then the PCB returns the voltage to stable.

Youll never get that accuracy with a simple potentiometer. How steady do you need the rpm to be?
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