Transfering a drawing onto wood - Router Forums
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post #1 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-10-2005, 11:08 PM Thread Starter
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Question Transfering a drawing onto wood

I had a question that hopefully someone will have an answer to. I have a high resolution picture on my computer that I want to duplicate on a piece of plywood. Now short of hand painting it on to wood, does anyone know any better method?

I was wondering if there was something like heat transfer paper or something similar to which I could print on, then align it up and iron it on and seal it with a lacquer.

Has anyone tried anything like this before?

Just a big kid..
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post #2 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-11-2005, 01:30 AM
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It's the age old art called decopage. Print out the picture, glue it on with a product called modge-podge available at craft stores.

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post #3 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-11-2005, 01:31 AM
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I will try a heat transfer this weekend onto wood. I think it requires using a laser print.

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post #4 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-11-2005, 02:02 AM
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I have used a laser printer to put patterns on wood. The image will print backwards so if the detail is such that it matters you will need to "flip" it before printing. If the laser has controls that allow you to put on more toner that helps as well. The smoother the surface you are going to put it on the better. I bought an old iron at a garage sale and use that..... no steam setting or other fancy features. I have a teflon iron pad I got at Wal-Mart for a couple of bucks to make it move smoother. If you get it too hot/keeping it in one place too long it can discolor the wood..... I would say give it a try and experment before working on the real thing.

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post #5 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-11-2005, 10:40 AM Thread Starter
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We have a color laser printer at the office that uses a waxy toner, instead of the typical dry powdery stuff.

When I first got my first fixed base a couple years ago, I tried tracing the lines of the image onto wood with carbon paper. While this worked well, I then tried tracing the transfered lines with a 60 degree signmaking bit. I had a challenging time with that, especially when it came to a sweeping arc, straight lines, or going at a angle that crosses grains.

The image I'm using is pretty much line art, verse photo realistic. I would have thought I would have had better luck with the router than I did. Keeping in mind that I was doing this on a small 4"x6" piece of wood at the time, sizing up to say 20"x30" might be a bit more forgiving for a slightly shakey hand. *laughs*

I look forward to hearing the results of the heat transfer test!

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post #6 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-11-2005, 11:15 AM
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You are aware you can get a pantograph for transfering drawings for under $20? You can adjust the image size by how you set up the tool. Look for it at Woodcraft. Another thought might be to make full sized patterns by glueing your printed picture onto Masonite, cutting it to size and using it as a template. That would be sure to give you a smooth edge.

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post #7 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-11-2005, 11:34 AM Thread Starter
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Hmm, that's an interesting idea. I'd have to make several templates though, wouldn't I? Doing just the outside would require one template because it would be a complete closed 'loop'. The details on the inside would likely require several more templates. I'll have to consider it if I plan on replicating the design on more than one final piece. Would I trace it out onto the hardboard first, then cut it with a sabersaw, or try and router it out?

Re pantographs, do they really work all that well with the weight of a router? I would've thought that it wouldn't be a very smooth movement. I looked at that option as well, but I don't have the experience to know what it's limitations might be.

Thanks for the ideas!

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post #8 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-11-2005, 06:00 PM
 
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When I was in the Military, I met a guy that used to take a picture, and put it on wood, then spread some (two part), epoxy on it, that was clear... Beautiful pictures and wonderful work.

The epoxy was mixed, then poured on the picture and wood, thus sealing in the picture to the wood. I believe in the 70s, they used to do this with professional pictures, because my Mother had one of my brothers and myself made, and to this day they are clear. So you might try this as an alternative.

I dont know what the two part epoxy is, but you could probably go to Ace Hardware, or a True Value Hardware store or some place that deals with that, and inquire...Jesse
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post #9 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-12-2005, 08:48 AM
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The pantograph I mentioned would be used only for doing a layout. Ed might be able to answer about the duplicator with a router attached. Seems like he mentioned one in a post.

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post #10 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-12-2005, 08:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aniceone2hold
The pantograph I mentioned would be used only for doing a layout. Ed might be able to answer about the duplicator with a router attached. Seems like he mentioned one in a post.
Hi,

Yes somewhere sitting on top an old kitchen cabinet now a garage shelf was my old ****** sorry I can't use the name as this is now a part of the "What is it?" game going on.

How these work is that you mount it to a work area. Then you mount the workpiece using a cleat and wedges (other ways might work as well). You tape the pattern (size is limited but you can use several patterns and several relocations of the work piece for bigger things. I found the relocation hard to line up.... like doing lettering. I also slipped my pattern in a plastic sleave to protect it.

You hold the router and use the router to make the pointer "trace" the pattern. At the time I got this I did not have a plunge router so that also made it a little harder then it might be using a plunge router.... haven't tried ??????. A few other things were mentioned at:

http://www.routerforums.com/showthread.php?t=842

Ed
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