Mitered corners - Page 3 - Router Forums
View Poll Results: V bits
I would purchase a longer/larger diameter 60 V bit for making hexagon miters. 2 7.14%
I would purchase a longer/larger diameter 67.5 V bit for making octogon miters. 0 0%
I would purchase both a 60 and a 67.5 V bit. 12 42.86%
I would not use these bits 14 50.00%
Voters: 28. You may not vote on this poll

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post #21 of 28 (permalink) Old 10-10-2012, 09:22 PM Thread Starter
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Ok Duane and BJ, now please show me how to make a sign with those bits? Decorative carvings?

For the third time yes, there are other ways to make the hex and octogon shapes. That is not the point. It seems nobody is interested in making relevent comments on the bits in question.

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post #22 of 28 (permalink) Old 10-10-2012, 09:54 PM
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Because most, if not all my mitres, and I use a lot of them, are routed on the table, and because I haven't been able to buy LARGE V bits as opposed to ones with bearings, I've had to make do with the latter, often removing the bearing to obtain that last fraction of cut. I suppose what I'm trying to say is that I would definately buy all the bigger V bits if they were to become available.
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post #23 of 28 (permalink) Old 10-11-2012, 06:29 AM
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Might a V bit with such an acute angle be rather fragile at the point?
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post #24 of 28 (permalink) Old 10-11-2012, 07:30 AM Thread Starter
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Andy, the bit for making the 30 cuts is a 60 V bit. The 22.5 cut is done with a 67.5 V bit. If the bits themselves were at those angles they would be very fragile indeed like the Amana InGroove replaceable carbide tip cutters for CNC work. Acute angles like this require precision machine control for the feed rate.

Point length is the portion of the cutter that makes the angle cut in the material. Longer point lengths require larger diameters.

60 V bits are commonly available in 7/16" point length; the idea of the two proposed bits is making them available with longer point lengths and larger diameters so they are capable of cutting a 3/4" board through in one pass. Cost on these bits should be less than the price of a similar angled chamfering bit with a bearing. This idea is about allowing a bit to perform more than one function by increasing its size. The bits would still handle any jobs you would normally use the smaller point length bits for.
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Last edited by Mike; 10-11-2012 at 07:33 AM.
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post #25 of 28 (permalink) Old 10-11-2012, 07:45 AM Thread Starter
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With this last explanation I realized that the poll options were not worded properly so I changed them.

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post #26 of 28 (permalink) Old 10-11-2012, 08:00 AM
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I'm confused regarding the difference between a "V" bit and a chamfer. I own a chamfer set like the sommerfield listed above. It will edge anything 3/4" and under. Are you asking if I would buy a chamfer bit that could edge 5/4" I would have when I bought my set from eagle

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post #27 of 28 (permalink) Old 10-11-2012, 08:06 AM
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Thanks Mike. Now I get it.

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post #28 of 28 (permalink) Old 10-11-2012, 08:16 AM Thread Starter
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Bill, chamfer bits have bearings on them, V bits are just that... they come to a point. V bits will handle chamfering operations when table mounted, make full angle cuts, are used to make signs or decorative carvings, can be used to create a ledge for securing aprons to table tops.

Sorry for the poor quality of the photo, it was taken with an old digital camera.
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