"What is it?" #136 - Router Forums
 
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post #1 of 3 (permalink) Old 05-10-2005, 10:47 PM Thread Starter
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Default "What is it?" #136

How are you at guessing? How are you at knowing your tools? How are you at guessing what I made about 30 some years ago?

This was back when I had a hand drill mounted in a little drill press I got from sears..... Anyway this is only half of the tool..... the other half looks just like this half if you need to picture it.

I made two sets of these, another guy supplied the wood and I did the work, only his got sanded and finished while mine I never did get back to completing.

So guess away..... the first right answer will be our winner and get 200 points and if you live close enough you can come over and borrow this if you will promise to sand then up and make them look finished.....

Good luck!

Ed
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post #2 of 3 (permalink) Old 05-10-2005, 11:58 PM
 
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Ah-ha... this one I have. That there is one half of a picture frame clamp jig.

Here's a picture of a full clamp (with a different working mechanism) in use.


The numerous holes down each arm are used to get the best clamping arrangement based on the size of the frame being clamped up.

I don't seel a hole in the base piece (where mine uses a piece of all-thread and a couple nuts for clamping pressure), so I'm assuming you used yours with a standard 'C' or 'F' clamp.

For typical use, a piece of waxed paper under each corner block will keep glue from setting up on the arm and making the frame a bit tough to remove. You will also notice that Ed's has a small radius hole in the center of the corner block cut-outs. This is to give glue squeeze-out someplace to go (again -- so yer not glueing your frame to the jig). Mine is missing this option, but hasn't caused a problem yet.

The jig is great in use, by placing the frame members into the jig and then holding the two base pieces (the piece the two arms connect to), then applying pressure to one side then the other -- the frame members will 'center up' and you can easily see if you have a bad miter that needs to be re-cut.

All in all -- if you plan on doing any picture frames, you need one of these jigs.

Last edited by NewMontanaWorkshop; 05-11-2005 at 12:03 AM.
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post #3 of 3 (permalink) Old 05-11-2005, 10:40 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowshoe
Ah-ha... this one I have. That there is one half of a picture frame clamp jig.

Here's a picture of a full clamp (with a different working mechanism) in use.


The numerous holes down each arm are used to get the best clamping arrangement based on the size of the frame being clamped up.

I don't seel a hole in the base piece (where mine uses a piece of all-thread and a couple nuts for clamping pressure), so I'm assuming you used yours with a standard 'C' or 'F' clamp.

This design called for a hand screw clamp but I like the way yours works. Actually almost any clamp would work.....

For typical use, a piece of waxed paper under each corner block will keep glue from setting up on the arm and making the frame a bit tough to remove. You will also notice that Ed's has a small radius hole in the center of the corner block cut-outs. This is to give glue squeeze-out someplace to go (again -- so yer not glueing your frame to the jig). Mine is missing this option, but hasn't caused a problem yet.

The "small radius holes" in the corners are so you don't crush the corners of the frame.

The jig is great in use, by placing the frame members into the jig and then holding the two base pieces (the piece the two arms connect to), then applying pressure to one side then the other -- the frame members will 'center up' and you can easily see if you have a bad miter that needs to be re-cut.

This dry fit is really one of the key features of this method. Of course none of us ever get the corner angles or lengths wrong but in case the wood shrinks or stretches after we have cut it perfect....

All in all -- if you plan on doing any picture frames, you need one of these jigs.
This was excelent!!!! I like how you explained how it worked and the picture was a real bonus. Take a few dollars out of the small change drawer and go buy yourself a new router bit or other tool! Really a good job.

Winner!!!!!!!
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