What are they? - Router Forums
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post #1 of 23 (permalink) Old 09-22-2018, 04:03 PM Thread Starter
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Default What are they?

Can anyone identify these tools? They were made by Stanley. Model number was 04118. I couldn't find a hit to that number, even on Stanley's website. Nor did I find a hit to the patent number #3,656.521 The only idea I can come up with is for removing broken screws and the owner says that the cutting edges appear to be for counter clockwise cutting. I'm hoping someone has actually used them before or seen them used. I suspect that they may be a few decades old.
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #2 of 23 (permalink) Old 09-22-2018, 04:12 PM
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that is exactly what they are...
screw shank extractors...

.

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

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post #3 of 23 (permalink) Old 09-22-2018, 06:05 PM Thread Starter
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Do you know how well they worked? I would have expected the centers to be hollow rather than the S pattern in these. Maybe the screw shank was meant to wedge in the S but that would seem to throw them off center then.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #4 of 23 (permalink) Old 09-22-2018, 06:36 PM
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Stanley 04119 looks the same to me and is called VINTAGE - STANLEY 04119 - 3/4" ELECTRICHISEL WOODCUTTING TOOL - CHISEL - DRILL Vintage 1974 - this is an electric drill attachment that does the work of a chisel. According to this https://www.worthpoint.com/worthoped...sel-1898848545

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post #5 of 23 (permalink) Old 09-22-2018, 07:14 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks Harold. The 04119 was a larger size of the same tool. Quite the odd duck as tools go.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #6 of 23 (permalink) Old 09-22-2018, 08:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stick486 View Post
that is exactly what they are...
screw shank extractors...
That one you show is also handy for drilling around nails in pallets, so you don't risk breaking the nails. Have to plug a few holes later, but you can salvage a lot more useful wood from a pallet that way. For those who have never salvaged pallet wood, those nails are brittle, and prone to break, no matter how careful you are pulling them.

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post #7 of 23 (permalink) Old 09-22-2018, 08:06 PM
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I think i know why they didn't catch on.
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post #8 of 23 (permalink) Old 09-22-2018, 08:24 PM
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I have never seen or heard of one of those in my 45 years of carpentry. Good on you Harold for identifying it. It never became popular as far as I knew.
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post #9 of 23 (permalink) Old 09-22-2018, 09:55 PM Thread Starter
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I'm going to make a few guesses about them. 50 Years ago routers were only JUST starting to catch on. They were still pretty uncommon. Not that many people I knew had a table saw either both for cost reasons and a place to put them. So this tool would have taken the place of a dado or a router for making grooves. The stop collar would have taken care of the depth. Maybe you could run them along a straight edge. I'd have to try one to see if that's possible. I had never seen or heard of them before either Herb so I'm also guessing that they may not have made it past the 50s.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #10 of 23 (permalink) Old 09-23-2018, 10:01 AM
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Interesting to run across old tools like this. Makes you appreciate all the modern stuff.

The more I do, the less I accomplish.
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