Help with a scroll saw and making gears. - Page 3 - Router Forums
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post #21 of 26 (permalink) Old 11-11-2019, 09:02 AM Thread Starter
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Before you buy any scroll saw try to change the blade. I had a Delta once that within the first 30 minutes the blade came off and in an attempt to get it back on messed up the thing with the lever on it that you use to hold the blade in. I had to take it in under warranty to get it fixed. After that, it came off numerous times. I unloaded the saw and never looked at a Delta again.
My saw is an old Dremel that can take the pinned blades or it uses these clamps similar to those found on the Bosch scroll saw. Those clamps are a bit of pain to get everything centered and tight but I have used them. I do like the pinned blades because they are quick to replace -- I broke a blade in the clamp things and it took me for ever to replace. I'm still a bit out of sorts so I have not gotten back to the saw yet.
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post #22 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-30-2019, 02:05 PM
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Default Wooden Gear Clock

I'm a brand new member here but I'm hoping I'm able to assist. I made Clayton Boyer's Genesis clock about 5 years ago. This is a weight driven wooden gear clock. It's still running today and keeps very good time (generally within a couple minutes in 24 hours). I cut it on a Delta 40-540, I guess it's a mid-range saw. Here's my clock on the first week it ran Opps I'm not allowed to post a URL

I'd certainly want to be doing this with pin-less blades. I probably used #0/2; #1; #2 all Olsen blades. I used and the plans recommended using Baltic Birch Plywood. I think most of it was 3/8" although some parts are to be made from hardwood. I used cherry. I sand the stock with 150 grit and cover with blue painters tape and use a spray adhesive to attach the pattern. (Note: I made extra copies of all the patterns in case things went side-ways.) I've tried covering the pattern with packing tape but I can't stand the reflection from the magnifying light. The painters tape just makes it easier to get the pattern off.

After drilling the center hole of each gear I used a simply circle cutting jig to spin the rough cut gear around so I knew that I was starting with a round piece of stock and the center was the real center. The cut was made just nipping the top of the gears. Then I went to the drill press. I picked a bit which matched exactly the size of the valley between two teeth. Then I drilled out that stock, rotated the gear on the pin to the next valley and kept going, all on the circle cutting jig. Then cutting the rest of the teeth is easy, just cut down each slop.

It's a lot of work but when you move that pendulum and the tick tok begin it's a great feeling. Hope this is of value. I'll try to return here if I can answer some questions. But I have a kid getting married Saturday 1/4 so I may not be back soon. Here's hoping this post comes out with the pics.
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post #23 of 26 (permalink) Old 12-31-2019, 06:15 PM
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I'm a brand new member here but I'm hoping I'm able to assist. I made Clayton Boyer's Genesis clock about 5 years ago. This is a weight driven wooden gear clock. It's still running today and keeps very good time (generally within a couple minutes in 24 hours). I cut it on a Delta 40-540, I guess it's a mid-range saw. Here's my clock on the first week it ran Opps I'm not allowed to post a URL

I'd certainly want to be doing this with pin-less blades. I probably used #0/2; #1; #2 all Olsen blades. I used and the plans recommended using Baltic Birch Plywood. I think most of it was 3/8" although some parts are to be made from hardwood. I used cherry. I sand the stock with 150 grit and cover with blue painters tape and use a spray adhesive to attach the pattern. (Note: I made extra copies of all the patterns in case things went side-ways.) I've tried covering the pattern with packing tape but I can't stand the reflection from the magnifying light. The painters tape just makes it easier to get the pattern off.

After drilling the center hole of each gear I used a simply circle cutting jig to spin the rough cut gear around so I knew that I was starting with a round piece of stock and the center was the real center. The cut was made just nipping the top of the gears. Then I went to the drill press. I picked a bit which matched exactly the size of the valley between two teeth. Then I drilled out that stock, rotated the gear on the pin to the next valley and kept going, all on the circle cutting jig. Then cutting the rest of the teeth is easy, just cut down each slop.

It's a lot of work but when you move that pendulum and the tick tok begin it's a great feeling. Hope this is of value. I'll try to return here if I can answer some questions. But I have a kid getting married Saturday 1/4 so I may not be back soon. Here's hoping this post comes out with the pics.
That’s awesome Paul !
I had no idea how gears were made . Certainly looks like meticulous work , but awesome outcome

I donít always insulate , but when I do .
Ok ,I never insulate
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post #24 of 26 (permalink) Old 01-06-2020, 07:01 AM Thread Starter
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That is super nice and I like the way you did the drill work in each of the teeth. I've been kind of laid up due to physical problems and only got to cut one larger gear (46 teeth) and the front and back panels for the clock work. I still need a few of the very small gears to complete the set but not sure when that will happen since my hands are not working well. This is the first chance I've had to answer back to all of you helpful people although I have to type slow and make a lot of corrections. I need to get a set of those special drills with the pilot points so I can drill accurately. I believe it's the only way I can make those small gears.

Oldprinter, a question for you. I know the size of the gears are set but I was wondering if you had any way to adjust the shaft they work on to allow for tooth spacing or did you try each gear and adjust the teeth clearance with something like fine sandpaper? I have run the gears together to test how well they mesh but I wonder about when they are operating slowly in the actual clock mechanism. By the way I found an old clock weight that looks like a thin pine cone and will try to duplicate it for the clock.

Thanks for posting those great gear pictures,
Charlie
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Last edited by clockwork; 01-06-2020 at 07:03 AM.
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post #25 of 26 (permalink) Old 01-06-2020, 03:25 PM
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Oldprinter
That is super nice and I like the way you did the drill work in each of the teeth. I've been kind of laid up due to physical problems and only got to cut one larger gear (46 teeth) and the front and back panels for the clock work. I still need a few of the very small gears to complete the set but not sure when that will happen since my hands are not working well. This is the first chance I've had to answer back to all of you helpful people although I have to type slow and make a lot of corrections. I need to get a set of those special drills with the pilot points so I can drill accurately. I believe it's the only way I can make those small gears.

Oldprinter, a question for you. I know the size of the gears are set but I was wondering if you had any way to adjust the shaft they work on to allow for tooth spacing or did you try each gear and adjust the teeth clearance with something like fine sandpaper? I have run the gears together to test how well they mesh but I wonder about when they are operating slowly in the actual clock mechanism. By the way I found an old clock weight that looks like a thin pine cone and will try to duplicate it for the clock.

Thanks for posting those great gear pictures,
Charlie
On the one and only clock I built I used the shaft sizes, exactly as the plans called for. In my limited experience, I found that the gears had a lot of play except in a couple of areas. Sometime in the next few days I'll take the clock apart and take a couple pictures of critical areas. Or I can PM you.

I have a couple of woodworking commitments, but when they're complete I'll be starting a new wooden gear clock. Hope you're feeling better soon.

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post #26 of 26 (permalink) Old 01-08-2020, 04:10 AM
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allow for tooth spacing or did you try each gear and adjust the teeth clearance with something like fine sandpaper?
Hi Charlie
The video 'The Elusive Tick', on the linked page below may be of interest to you, you'll see the tooth engagement is quite loose. David also gives some tips on making arbors run freely.
I've not yet tried any of these tips but I did buy one of David's kits, it's in my project pile

TIPS AND TRICKS
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