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post #1 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-10-2017, 09:35 PM Thread Starter
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Default Honey Locust

Do any of the many experienced woodworkers out there have experience working with honey locust? I have quite a bit of it that I have milled into 2" flitches and 10" square cants. Gorgeous character in the grains and knots. Not sure what I will attempt to build with it, may sell some.

Any input would be appreciated.
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post #2 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-10-2017, 10:17 PM
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Love that honey color. is that a fresh sawn green board?
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post #3 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-10-2017, 10:35 PM
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According to wood data book.
Honey Locust can be difficult to work with hand and machine tools on account of its density, though it generally produces good results. Turns, glues, stains, and finishes well.
Used in furniture , fence post and turned objects.
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post #4 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-10-2017, 11:01 PM Thread Starter
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Yes Herb, it is freshly milled. Logs were cut about 3 years ago.
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post #5 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-10-2017, 11:41 PM
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The Honey Locust tree grows quickly to a height up to 100 feet tall, but is short-lived, living "only" around 120 years. It is popular as an ornamental plant, especially in colder climates where few other trees can survive. Most specimens I see around here are pretty small and are decorative. The picture below is a large specimen honey locust.

The black locust, on the other hand, looks to be a good species, tough, rot resistant, good grain, I think I'd like to try working with some of that. The Black Locust apparently was abundant when the country was founded, and is being farmed again. The board is a chunk of Black Locust, pretty nice grain and color.
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post #6 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-10-2017, 11:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhtmtree View Post
Yes Herb, it is freshly milled. Logs were cut about 3 years ago.
I used some black locust one time and it was really heavy, but seemed to cut an plane on power tools quite well.
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post #7 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-11-2017, 04:03 AM
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Those are some very nice flitches Mike. I'm envious.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #8 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-11-2017, 06:50 AM
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During ground clearing for planting in IL, Dad and I cut a lot of Honey Locust and Black Locust. I can attest to it's density, hardness and weight. Dad used it for firewood. I wish we would have saved a lot of it. But, at the time, neither of us were wood workers. It's gorgeous wood and, probably worth the effort to work it.
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post #9 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-11-2017, 06:59 AM
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Really nice for panels and trim. Grain can be absolutely beautiful and is often featured in a build. a real bear when it comes to sanding contours and sweeps. Can be a bit splintery.

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post #10 of 18 (permalink) Old 03-11-2017, 08:34 AM Thread Starter
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I know quite a bit about the species of trees due to the fact that I am an arborist. I bought a sawmill to process some of the many logs we haul in from my jobs. After seeing some of the beautiful grains and characters in the boards, I wanted to get into woodworking using some of the boards.

Being a novice in working with the boards instead of the trees, I recognize that I am going to need quite a bit of guidance.

As far as Black Locust vs Honey Locust...I have quite a bit of both. I have a pretty consistent supply of Black Locust due to the prevalence of it in our area. Large honey locust on the other hand is not as common in sawlogs.

Thank you all for sharing some of your tips and experiences.
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