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post #1 of 23 (permalink) Old 03-11-2017, 11:38 PM Thread Starter
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Default Russian Olive TreeWood

I am not sure if anyone has tried to use the wood from a Russian Olive Tree. Here, we call it a nasty trash tree. Sometimes the trees grow up to be only a nasty bush. At other times, it grows like a real tree and has a large trunk and large branches. Can't kill them with dynamite. When they are in bloom, they smell terrible. Long story short. Today I saw wood from one of those nasty trees. The wood is beautiful. It was of a greenish color. It cannot be ripped or cross cut to get the color. It has to be cut length wise at angle as it is cut and then this color shows up.

Oh, and it is harder than the hubs of hell. They demonstrated a cut and then used a drill to work with it. It is hard.

I was just curious if anyone else and I am sure there must be others who have seen and used this wood. I tried to get a picture of it today, but my phone camera did not take a decent picture. I will try and get a picture and see if I can figure out how to post a picture. Thanks for reading
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post #2 of 23 (permalink) Old 03-12-2017, 08:25 AM
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Where does Russian Olive trees grow Frank?
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post #3 of 23 (permalink) Old 03-12-2017, 08:34 AM
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from Denverwoodslabs.com


http://www.denverwoodslabs.com/wp-co...9-818x1024.jpg
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post #4 of 23 (permalink) Old 03-12-2017, 09:00 AM
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It grows in North Dakota I know. Have not seen any milled or worked.
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post #5 of 23 (permalink) Old 03-12-2017, 09:07 AM
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That is some pretty wood Bill. Looks a little like Walnut little lighter in color.
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post #6 of 23 (permalink) Old 03-12-2017, 09:14 AM
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Just read where is is considered a noxious weed in Wyoming.
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post #7 of 23 (permalink) Old 03-12-2017, 09:39 AM
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Default Russian Olive

It's also a nasty wood in new Jersey. Can't cut them down fast enough. They're all over the place. The worst part is that some Landscape places sell them.
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post #8 of 23 (permalink) Old 03-12-2017, 10:40 AM
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Definitely a weed in New Mexico. The only tree that's worse around here are Siberian Elms.

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post #9 of 23 (permalink) Old 03-12-2017, 11:08 AM
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from wikipedia;
Elaeagnus angustifolia was described as Zizyphus cappadocica by John Gerard, and was grown by John Parkinson by 1633,[4] and was also grown in Germany in 1736. It is now widely grown across southern and central Europe as a drought-resistant ornamental plant for its scented flowers, edible fruit, attractive yellow foliage, and black bark.
The species was introduced into North America in the late 19th century, and subsequently escaped cultivation, because its fruits, which seldom ripen in England,[5] are relished by birds which disperse the seeds. Russian olive is considered to be an invasive species in many places in the United States because it thrives on poor soil, has low seedling mortality rates, matures in a few years, and outcompetes wild native vegetation. It often invades riparian habitats where overstory cottonwoods have died.
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post #10 of 23 (permalink) Old 03-12-2017, 12:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by belaire445 View Post
It's also a nasty wood in new Jersey. Can't cut them down fast enough. They're all over the place. The worst part is that some Landscape places sell them.
Yes , quite popular here. Garden centres sell them routinely. Seen regularly as ornamentals in gardens. Very large thorns and wicked to be around. Some as near trees and some as overgrown shrubs.
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