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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-22-2011, 08:05 PM Thread Starter
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I've been buying Red Oak 4/4 in the rough. I comes mostly around 12 foot with various widths. I've been getting it for $2.25 a board foot. I've been straight edging it, planing it to ¾" thick and sanding to 100 grit. I've been selling it for $3.75 a board foot after that. Am I in the ball park or am I missing something? Here lately I've started taking more orders and I am wondering if I am selling short or should I just enjoy getting more orders? Please keep in mind that I am still a greenhorn and am looking for your expert advice on how to proceed. I am now unemployed but making it on my own selling benches and wood. I need to do better though.
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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-23-2011, 11:24 AM
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My observation is that lumber prices are highly regional. Check both the local competition and suppliers who are known for shipping. Also, review the source of your orders (i.e. where the customers are located). Assuming your current pricing was thoughtfully-determined, the comparisons should give you proper guidance. Note, too, that any price increases at this point in time might easily evaporate the increased business.

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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-23-2011, 07:50 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Ralph Barker View Post
My observation is that lumber prices are highly regional. Check both the local competition and suppliers who are known for shipping. Also, review the source of your orders (i.e. where the customers are located). Assuming your current pricing was thoughtfully-determined, the comparisons should give you proper guidance. Note, too, that any price increases at this point in time might easily evaporate the increased business.
I am actually fairly under what is being sold locally. I dont know about the ones who ship but now that you've brought that up it does make since to know what they have and what they are getting for it. I do have some good news on that front though. Today my supplier told me I earned a rate decrease because my quantity has risen. Coolness indeed. I have been taking every penny from those sales and putting it back in inventory. I am going to pass some of those savings on to my customer
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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-24-2011, 10:45 AM
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That sounds like a pretty good deal to me. Here in southwest ohio I pay just under $3/bdft
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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-24-2011, 11:30 AM
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One other point I forgot to ask about, Michael. You mentioned that you sand to 100 grit after planing. I'd question whether that is a good idea, since sanding can leave residual grit in the pores of the wood. That residual grit, in turn, can be bad news for the customer who surfaces the wood further.

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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-24-2011, 05:45 PM Thread Starter
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One other point I forgot to ask about, Michael. You mentioned that you sand to 100 grit after planing. I'd question whether that is a good idea, since sanding can leave residual grit in the pores of the wood. That residual grit, in turn, can be bad news for the customer who surfaces the wood further.
Ralph, would you talk more about that please? I am not getting it

I sold 91 BF today.
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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-24-2011, 10:27 PM
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Originally Posted by mjdtexan View Post
Ralph, would you talk more about that please? I am not getting it

I sold 91 BF today.
You're better off to sell it as is for 2 reasons.

1: Most woodworkers own a planer and prefer to plane their boards to a set thickness for a given project that requires joining boards together.

2: Like Ralph said, I dont think it's a good idea to sand with 100 grit, it leaves to rough of a surface for finishing, have you ever sanded with 100 and then 220 right after? forget it, if the lumber is planed right... 220 is all that's need to finish it.

3: You will save on the wear and tear on you machines and save on sand paper, it's not a bad idea to offer the service to you're customers if they need it, charge them a small fee so you can cover you're costs.

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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-25-2011, 10:42 AM
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Ralph, would you talk more about that please? I am not getting it

I sold 91 BF today.
When sanding, tiny bits of the grit can break off and lodge in the grain structure of the wood - especially with open-grained species like red oak. Those tiny bits of grit will damage the blades of subsequently-used tools, like planers or hand planes, chisels, saw blades, etc.

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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-25-2011, 12:40 PM
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Michael,

Just my $0.02...

As Ralph and Glen point out, there are many with planers and sanders who prefer to buy their material in a "rougher" form and without the possibility of imbedded sanding grit. There are also many who either do not have, or do not want to spend the time, planing and rough-sanding.

I believe that there are two niches out there and you can choose to fill either or both. In the Anchorage market, the largest local cabinetmaker's wood supplier sells about 95% of their wood S3S, or two nicely surfaced faces and one straight edge. Cabinetmakers can order rougher wood but the suppolier tells me few here do.

When I was in Colorado I noticed there were sawyers selling raw or kiln-dried slabs, so I've no doubt there's a market for that too.

For commercial buyers it would seem to be a matter of their labor / equipment costs that makes their decision.

I propose that you consider your local market demand, determine what value-add you wish to provide (or what makes you the most $$ ) and go from there..

That's my opinion.. and as we all know, opinions are like... noses... we all have one... but only yours matters to you! <g>

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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 02-25-2011, 06:20 PM Thread Starter
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When sanding, tiny bits of the grit can break off and lodge in the grain structure of the wood - especially with open-grained species like red oak. Those tiny bits of grit will damage the blades of subsequently-used tools, like planers or hand planes, chisels, saw blades, etc.
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Originally Posted by BigJimAK View Post
Michael,

Just my $0.02...

As Ralph and Glen point out, there are many with planers and sanders who prefer to buy their material in a "rougher" form and without the possibility of imbedded sanding grit. There are also many who either do not have, or do not want to spend the time, planing and rough-sanding.

I believe that there are two niches out there and you can choose to fill either or both. In the Anchorage market, the largest local cabinetmaker's wood supplier sells about 95% of their wood S3S, or two nicely surfaced faces and one straight edge. Cabinetmakers can order rougher wood but the suppolier tells me few here do.

When I was in Colorado I noticed there were sawyers selling raw or kiln-dried slabs, so I've no doubt there's a market for that too.

For commercial buyers it would seem to be a matter of their labor / equipment costs that makes their decision.

I propose that you consider your local market demand, determine what value-add you wish to provide (or what makes you the most $$ ) and go from there..

That's my opinion.. and as we all know, opinions are like... noses... we all have one... but only yours matters to you! <g>
I would like to sell to the ones who would like buy their wood rough as well as those who dont. I also dont want to gouge either. I want to provide value to them. The reason I am selling wood is to get my board feet up and keep my price down so that I can afford to build nice tables. It also helps the small hobbyist who does not know where to get kiln dried, quality wood at a fair price. I know I am much much cheaper than Lowes or Homey Depot. When I first got into wood as a hobby all I could afford to buy was pine and I didn't know where to buy hardwood at a reasonable price. I picked up some Hickory today. It has beautiful figure in it. I only got 67 bf of it. Its 4/4 rough. I need to figure out what its worth, and get it stickered properly.

Last edited by mjdtexan; 02-25-2011 at 07:01 PM.
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