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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-12-2012, 02:23 PM Thread Starter
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Default Butcher Block?

Two questions for you guys, what type of wood do you suggest and non toxic finish? My wife asked me to make her one, 12"x18" something to that effect though nothing is concrete at the moment

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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-13-2012, 01:51 PM
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Default Butcher Block

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Originally Posted by L Town Graphics View Post
Two questions for you guys, what type of wood do you suggest and non toxic finish? My wife asked me to make her one, 12"x18" something to that effect though nothing is concrete at the moment
First off: Concrete is no good for cutting boards!! LOL
I really love to use maple for cutting boards. Contrasting woods that work well are paduke or bloodwood (red), holly (yellow), and a number of dark brown s. I do not suggest walnut as I have experienced some bitter flavor transfer at times. The most perfect non toxic coating I have found is hemp oil, available from hempola.com. You are only limited by your imagination.

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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-13-2012, 05:07 PM
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Reg; I'd be surprised if they can buy anything from the hemp plant, South of 49(?)...
USDA ERS - Industrial Hemp in the United States: Status and Market Potential
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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-18-2012, 08:05 PM Thread Starter
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Reg; I'd be surprised if they can buy anything from the hemp plant, South of 49(?)...
USDA ERS - Industrial Hemp in the United States: Status and Market Potential
Dan, I don't know if they are all the same so to speak but I found a few places on the Internet that sell it. Was at lowes today getting some ideas as far as size n price on maple. Thinking of 2 1/2" wide 3/4" thick and 12". Was gonna put them up on edge and glue and or dowel together.

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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-18-2012, 10:18 PM
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Hey Dan. Hard Maple is the way to go on cutting boards and if you go to HD or Lowes you can find an off the shelf cutting board oil that is non toxic. I have also used Olive oil and it does a good job.

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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-19-2012, 12:56 AM Thread Starter
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Hey Dan. Hard Maple is the way to go on cutting boards and if you go to HD or Lowes you can find an off the shelf cutting board oil that is non toxic. I have also used Olive oil and it does a good job.
thanks for the help Troy!

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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-19-2012, 02:49 AM
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Thought I'd add that most cutting board finishes are either mineral oil or mineral oil/paraffin.

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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-19-2012, 07:16 AM
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All commercial butcher blocks are hard maple. Mineral oil is really the best choice since it will not go rancid like other oils. You can pick up a bottle for under $2 most places. One note, although it should not be a problem I would avoid using any red wood in food related projects; most of them are toxic.

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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-19-2012, 02:37 PM
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Hi Dan

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All commercial butcher blocks are hard maple.
In western Europe butcher's blocks are generally (traditionally) either beech or sycamore (our equivalent of maple which doesn't really grow here). Modern blocks are also made from rubberwood and sometimes bamboo. The timber choice needs to be extremely fine grained but relatively hard, which excludes timbers like oak and ash (which being coarse grained will splinter under the knife), light coloured (because coloured timbers can often colour or taint delicately-scented/flavoured foods) and without any natural chemicals, such as tannin (on which grounds oaks, all true mahoganies and walnuts are out because they all contain tannin which will leave a bitter aftertaste). Personally I'd avoid the use of coloured timbers unless the board is purely decorative

I have to agree with Mike about finishes - liquid paraffin (available from chemists/pharmacies) is an excellent, non-toxic finish which will not go rancid

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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-19-2012, 02:49 PM
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I was just responding to Reg's "most perfect non toxic coating I have found is hemp oil, available from hempola.com."

No problem getting pretty much anything from Hemp, here...
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