Suitable Hardwoods For External Window Frame & Sash - Router Forums
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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-29-2013, 04:45 PM Thread Starter
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Default Suitable Hardwoods For External Window Frame & Sash

I have an idea just want to hear what others say.
The timber will be unpainted but probably stained, perhaps oiled?
I'm in the UK, South West, Swindon area.
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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-29-2013, 06:22 PM
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Over in this area they tend to be made from pine, red cedar, and sometimes Douglas fir but I suspect that has more to do with price and availability than anything else. All 3 species are native to the North American northwest and in plentiful supply. There are no commercial hardwoods here. Many here are going to vinyl for durability and lack of upkeep. I suspect your best choice would be oak?

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-30-2013, 02:42 AM
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This might help you to decide based on your use and the wood species available in the UK:
Timber Species Guide - TRADA ...all about wood and timber

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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-30-2013, 02:51 AM
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Why hardwood, Peter? Availability?
What Charles said, re N. America. Add Cypress for our Southern neighbours.
What do your custom window shops use over there?
(Where's PhilP when you need him, eh?)
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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-30-2013, 03:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaia View Post
I have an idea just want to hear what others say.
The timber will be unpainted but probably stained, perhaps oiled?
I'm in the UK, South West, Swindon area.
Seeing that you are from the UK these would be my picks....

Hardwoods that would be "desireable" for your use would be White Oak (American), the Mahoganies (Phillipine, Honduran), Locust, Ipe (iron woods), Mesquite, Ash, Teak and Eucalyptus...

Softwoods would include Western Red Cedar, Redwood, Port Orford Cedar, Southern Yellow Pine, most Spruces, and Bald Cypress...FWIW.

Best picks in order would be...

Northern White and Western Red Cedars..
Teak...
Eucalyptus...
White Oak...

Northern White and Western Red Cedars
Both of these woods are native to North America and are traditionally used for boat building, house siding and furniture. They’re valued for their combination of lightweight, interesting grain pattern and extreme durability in outdoor conditions. Although cedar will show knots and cracks in the grain, it maintains its durability for 20 years or more without warping, splitting or rotting. Its light-colored surface will weather to a silver-gray patina....

Teak
The king of durable woods, teak will hold up long enough to pass down to the next generation. It needs no maintenance (aside from the occasional light sanding or cleaning to remove surface dirt), is dense and straight-grained, and will not warp or crack over time. Because of its high mineral content, teak resists rotting even in the wettest conditions. Over time, the surface of the wood will weather to a beautiful silver-gray patina...

Eucalyptus
A renewable resource - eucalyptus is a plantation-grown hardwood that is sustainably harvested and in plentiful supply. This high-quality, kiln-dried timber is incredibly solid with great durability and strength and has beautiful grain and a smooth finish that requires minimal maintenance. Eucalyptus is extremely dense, rot- and decay-resistant with a high oil content that repels water and moisture. It also weathers to a soft gray if left untreated, however, it can be stained to maintain its rich tones....

American White Oak
Its unique cell structure repels moisture, insects and rot. The famous American sailing ship, Old Iron Side, was built with white oak and could repel British cannon balls. Dense and straight-grained, white oak furniture has an oil finish and can be left to weather to a gray patina or cleaned and re-oiled annually....

But you know there are more choices...

African Ebony
Aglaia
Chakte Viga
Cumaru
Curupay
Goncalo Alves
Guajayvi
Iroko
Jarrah
Jatoba
Merbau
Monkey Pod
Palo Maria
Purple Heart
Sirari Teak
Volador..........................

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-30-2013, 03:36 PM Thread Starter
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Over in this area they tend to be made from pine, red cedar, and sometimes Douglas fir but I suspect that has more to do with price and availability than anything else. All 3 species are native to the North American northwest and in plentiful supply. There are no commercial hardwoods here. Many here are going to vinyl for durability and lack of upkeep. I suspect your best choice would be oak?
OK thanks.
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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-30-2013, 03:37 PM Thread Starter
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This might help you to decide based on your use and the wood species available in the UK:
Timber Species Guide - TRADA ...all about wood and timber

To use, requires a free registration.
I signed up, interesting stuff, thanks.
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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-30-2013, 03:49 PM Thread Starter
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OK, the timber merchant I have in mind, carries European Oak at a very good price. So looks like I'm going to use European Oak.
Cheers.
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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 06-30-2013, 03:50 PM Thread Starter
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[QUOTE=Stick486;341139]Seeing that you are from the UK these would be my picks....

Hardwoods that would be "desireable" for your use would be White Oak (American), the Mahoganies (Phillipine, Honduran), Locust, Ipe (iron woods), Mesquite, Ash, Teak and Eucalyptus...

OK, the timber merchant I have in mind, carries European Oak at a very good price. So looks like I'm going to use European Oak.
Cheers.
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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 07-04-2013, 01:15 PM
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Default External Wooden windows

Ok Gaia,

i dit windowmaking for living,so i can tell you wat the hell of wood u use the best in the UK,for making windows.
Because i am from Belgium so we have the same type of weather exept i think our country's wil import different hardwoods.
European oak is not a bad choise but it still is class II/III ( this is 2 to 3 )
Teak is realy the best choise,it is class I but you don't want to pay it.
It is a beautifull wood to,i think it is the most stable wood of all.
Other hardwoods you can use.
- Afrormosia, class I/II stable. ( verry nice wood )
- Afzelia Bipindensis class I very stable.
- Iroko ( Kambala ) class I/II very stable.
- Mahoghony African class III stable
- Mahoghony american (Swietenia) class II very stable
- jatoba class II stable
- Makoré class I stable
- Merbau class I/II very stable
- Moabi class I stable
- Padouk class I very stable.
- Sappeli class II stable
- Sipo class II/III stable
- Merantie Class II/IV stable
- American red Cedar class II stable
In Belgium and Holland whe use the most Merantie and Sipo because for its price it is a good choice.
Red Cedar is mechanicly not strong enough and it is in Europe much more expencive than in the states.
Hope i could help you...

Kind regards
andré54
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