Is Apple tree wood usable for woodworking?? - Router Forums
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post #1 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-04-2015, 01:34 PM Thread Starter
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Question Is Apple tree wood usable for woodworking??

I came to the wood species forum in search of an answer from the experts as to the worthiness of apple tree wood in wood working projects. Is it a "soft" or "hard" wood? What is its workability on lathe, router, drill, saw etc? What is the best application for apple wood? I ask these questions because I will need to take down an expired apple tree in my backyard this year. The trunk diameter is about 8", and some branches are 4", so the wood yield could be promising for some project, after suitable drying time. Any tips are sought.
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post #2 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-04-2015, 02:39 PM
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The Wood Database is a great source of info. It has an entry for Apple.

Lots of movement when drying, looks a lot like cherry and is very hard. I bet you could get some fabulous grain from old and tortured trees, though.

Let us know how it works out for you. My wife is from Wenatchee, WA which is the center of the Apple growing universe (at least they think so) - could be an interesting source there.
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post #3 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-04-2015, 04:01 PM
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I knew someone who used it for turnings on his lathe. He was always looking for it so he must have liked it.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #4 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-04-2015, 05:28 PM
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Hard to come by in any real (large) sizes! Make sure it has dried, and dried well. Beautiful stuff when ya get a good board or two. Well worth the effort to try and
salvage what you can from the tree. Branch wood is hit and miss with most speices, but if you've the mind, dry some and see where it goes. Older tree's tend to spalt.
when they do, you can end up with some outstanding looking wood.

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post #5 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-04-2015, 07:05 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you for the info about apple tree wood. Phil, I did look at THE WOOD DATABASE at your suggestion and it provided much needed information that I was seeking. I will proceed to salvage what I can from this tree. I planted it myself a few years ago, and whatever apples I did not get the local deer population stopped by and enjoyed. My peach tree and cherry tree are still alive. When I bought this acre in 1989 there were three cherry and even a pear tree, but when they died I did not think to save the wood .

Is a two year indoor drying period adequate for the wood after cutting?
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post #6 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-04-2015, 11:04 PM
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The general rule of thumb is one year per inch of thickness. You have to be careful drying inside. It can be too dry or too wet depending on where you put it. I would paint the ends to help keep the moisture loss as even as possible. Uneven drying causes cracking and warpage. Painting melted parafin on works well too.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.

Last edited by Cherryville Chuck; 05-05-2015 at 11:42 AM. Reason: Auto correct was incorrect.
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post #7 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-05-2015, 06:25 AM
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I have a baby's rattle that a woodturner made during a demonstration out of a piece of apple. I smelled great and the baby loved it. He's getting married next month. Where did the 30 years go?
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post #8 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-05-2015, 08:16 AM
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That wood is absolutely no use for wood working. Send it to me for disposal. :-)

I love turning fruit wood of any sort. Always a surprise, and a joy to turn into a bowl, lidded jar, rolling pin, dreidel, etc.

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post #9 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-05-2015, 09:38 AM
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Rick, Apple wood is prized for making wooden hand planes.
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post #10 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-05-2015, 10:40 AM
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Don't throw out the little pieces, apple is wonderful wood for ribs and brisket in the smoker.


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