Cyclone Dust Collection - Router Forums
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post #1 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-26-2018, 10:29 PM Thread Starter
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Default Cyclone Dust Collection

Finally got the Cyclone dust collection finished in the shop. I took an old Penn State 1-1/2hp and turned it into a two stage with a Super dust deputy cyclone. 6" duct with 4" drops and blast gates. I'm waiting on the 6" flex hose for the connection between the cyclone and the barrel and plan on buying a HEPA filter down the road.
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Last edited by Jeff Speedster929; 12-26-2018 at 10:32 PM.
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post #2 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-27-2018, 12:19 AM
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I think you're going to love that thing! I keep thinking I should pop for a cyclone instead of the Rockler setup with a 30 gallon fiber drum. The filter will help a lot. I put my DC and filter outside in a covered area so the finest dust doesn't escape. I think the at the tool dust collection is the most important part of DC.
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post #3 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-29-2018, 10:33 AM
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A cyclone is definitely the way to go, but I think you will be up sizing the blower horsepower before long. You will probably also be having fits trying to get a leak tight seal on that metal trash can lid. Although metal trash cans are easy to find, they tend to be hard to seal the lid and seams when using them for this purpose. I went with a metal grease barrel because the barrel has welded seams and a smooth top lip to seal to the lid. When running, any leak in the hose connection or barrel below the cyclone will significantly reduce the efficiency of your system, and it will also result in considerable amounts of dust and chips getting past the cyclone and into your filter bag. A cyclone depends on no up air flow from below or the dust and chips won't fall out the bottom of the cyclone into the collection container and some will end up getting past the cyclone.

I used some 1" wide "closed cell" foam Weather stripping applied where the lid of my collection drum and the drum top edge come together with the sticky side of it attaching it to the lid. I carefully cut the two ends of the Weatherstrip at the same time using a razor blade, so there is no leak between them. The vacuum pulls the lid tight to the barrel when it's running, so I haven't needed any mechanical fasteners, just gravity keeps the lid on when the vacuum is turned off. I used a smoke generator held close to possible leak points to see if I had any leaks after I had assembled my system. They sell smoke detector test spray that works well for this. A smoldering piece of clothes line rope works, but don't use it if you have any dust or wood chips in the system because a spark from it might be drawn in. The smoke spray is the safest and most reasonably priced way to test for vacuum leaks. You need to spray it near the possible leak and then watch to see if any is being drawn in. Use good lighting so you can see if this is happening. Leaks in the joints of your system can be found the same way. The HVAC guys use a rubbery paint-on sealer for duct leaks, or you could just use the silver duct tape and carefully apply it to avoid wrinkles which might leak. Any leak in the pipes between your machines and the cyclone will reduce the vacuum level at your machines. With only a 1 1/2 hp system you can't afford to have any leaks or efficiency losses.


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Last edited by CharleyL; 12-29-2018 at 11:30 AM.
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post #4 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-30-2018, 09:43 PM
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ULine has fiber drums with steel tops that seal nicely. Many sizes. I use the 30 gallon with a ring that locks the top to the drum.
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post #5 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-30-2018, 11:45 PM
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I have a 4" garbage can topper I got at Woodcraft with a 30 gallon steel trash can. It works pretty good at keeping out the big chunks and I get a lot less fine dust in my Jet 1.5 HP dust collector. A real cyclone would work better but there are the limitations of time and money.

I also have a Onieda dust deputy for the shop vac (2") and that works great at keeping the shop vac from becoming clogged in 5 minutes or less.

Since I have a pre vortex Jet retrofitting if the most cost effective. If I did not have a dust collector then I would definitely spring for a cyclonic type dust collector. The technology of the cyclonic is much more advanced than the old bag and blower type collector and even with the fancy pleated dust filter the cyclone beats that older technology.

For any dust collection system to be effective it has to work near peak vacuum. The cyclonic action keeps your filter cleaner longer and leads to better dust collection. Better dust collection leads to better air quality. Small dust particles are dangerous especially if you already have respiratory issues.

As Ben Franklin said " A stitch in time saves nine". Better to prevent breathing problems than treat them later.
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post #6 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-30-2018, 11:51 PM
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Since i use a trash can similar to yours I would suggest you cut a hole in the can about 2/3 of the way up and glue in a clear plastic window. The window will get dust on it but you can see when the can is getting full. Out of sight and out of mind. Just check the can regularly or the can will fill up before you know it. If you start to see more saw dust in the clear bag on the collector your can is full.

You set up looks good.
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post #7 of 27 (permalink) Old 01-09-2019, 11:00 AM Thread Starter
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Got the floor epoxied in the secondary part of the shop... What a big change between old and new. Also, got a better seal on the can lid and a 6" flex hose between the cyclone and dump lid. I'm impressed with the suction when two blast gates are open at the same time. Now all I need is a cartridge filter sometime down the road...
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post #8 of 27 (permalink) Old 01-09-2019, 11:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Speedster929 View Post
Got the floor epoxied in the secondary part of the shop... What a big change between old and new. Also, got a better seal on the can lid and a 6" flex hose between the cyclone and dump lid. I'm impressed with the suction when two blast gates are open at the same time. Now all I need is a cartridge filter sometime down the road...
Here is a link to the filter cartridge I've used for 10 years. https://wynnenv.com/woodworking-filters/

Your floor looks great! I need to apply to my shop floor however I would need to do a lot of scraping and cleaning first.
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post #9 of 27 (permalink) Old 01-13-2019, 12:35 PM
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The floor does look great.

Get yourself some of the metal foil type of duct sealing tape and do a good tight seal on every joint in the ducting and even the seams in the segments of your elbows. Any leak between the tool and the blower is an inward leak and results in vacuum loss at the tool. You will improve your system's efficiency by sealing these. Any leak after the blower is an outward leak and puts saw dust in the shop air..... and your lungs.

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post #10 of 27 (permalink) Old 01-13-2019, 01:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharleyL View Post
A cyclone is definitely the way to go, but I think you will be up sizing the blower horsepower before long. You will probably also be having fits trying to get a leak tight seal on that metal trash can lid. Although metal trash cans are easy to find, they tend to be hard to seal the lid and seams when using them for this purpose. I went with a metal grease barrel because the barrel has welded seams and a smooth top lip to seal to the lid. When running, any leak in the hose connection or barrel below the cyclone will significantly reduce the efficiency of your system, and it will also result in considerable amounts of dust and chips getting past the cyclone and into your filter bag. A cyclone depends on no up air flow from below or the dust and chips won't fall out the bottom of the cyclone into the collection container and some will end up getting past the cyclone.

I used some 1" wide "closed cell" foam Weather stripping applied where the lid of my collection drum and the drum top edge come together with the sticky side of it attaching it to the lid. I carefully cut the two ends of the Weatherstrip at the same time using a razor blade, so there is no leak between them. The vacuum pulls the lid tight to the barrel when it's running, so I haven't needed any mechanical fasteners, just gravity keeps the lid on when the vacuum is turned off. I used a smoke generator held close to possible leak points to see if I had any leaks after I had assembled my system. They sell smoke detector test spray that works well for this. A smoldering piece of clothes line rope works, but don't use it if you have any dust or wood chips in the system because a spark from it might be drawn in. The smoke spray is the safest and most reasonably priced way to test for vacuum leaks. You need to spray it near the possible leak and then watch to see if any is being drawn in. Use good lighting so you can see if this is happening. Leaks in the joints of your system can be found the same way. The HVAC guys use a rubbery paint-on sealer for duct leaks, or you could just use the silver duct tape and carefully apply it to avoid wrinkles which might leak. Any leak in the pipes between your machines and the cyclone will reduce the vacuum level at your machines. With only a 1 1/2 hp system you can't afford to have any leaks or efficiency losses.


Charley
Sealing the lid is very important unless you don't mind sawdust in your filters. I used the widely available foam tape that's 1-1/2 to 2" wide and put in on the inside lid perimeter. Several layers and haven't had a leak since. In fact it's so tight that when the 30 gallon galvanized can is empty my CV1800 lifts it off the floor. But mine is 16" steel impeller and 5 HP. As for leak testing I used a gallon paint can (new/empty) and used a plastic hose to direct the smoke from the incense I burned in the can. Puts out smoke and smells good as well. I did use 3" metal tape to seal all joints. See my DC system here and here Notice the first picture on the second page. This is the results without a good can lid seal and that filled the filters about 1/2 way up. What a mess. What isn't pictured is the safety switch I installed to shut down the DC if it fills and also gives a strobe alert as well as a horn. See this for more info. You could build a simpler version without the strobe light and using standard garage door sensors and a relay which is basically what the garage door safety circuit does. Depends on your level of skill. Really needed, well at least highly recommended anyway, if you DC is out of eyesight of the shop area.
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