Time to collect some dust... - Page 3 - Router Forums
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post #21 of 55 (permalink) Old 11-07-2014, 07:16 PM
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My shop is my garage so space was a primary consideration. I purchased the Dust Right components from Rockler, a 15 gallon fiber drum from Amazon and used a 1 HP dust collector from Harbor Freight to build a self contained unit that I store under the table saw wing when not in use. I have since built a roll around dolly for it using the wheels that came with the HF dust collector. It works pretty well.
I've been badly in need of finally adding proper dust collection to my router, and I was ready to spend perhaps $100-150 on a higher-powered shopvac, which would mostly, but not entirely, be used for router DC. I thought a real C would cost way more than that, and have now realized that is not so, at least as long as I shop at Harbor Freight. Given the relative small amount of woodwork that I do, their level of durability is probably quite acceptable for me.

(Recently, I came across a post in a DC discussion by Mike "from Detroit" where he says that a shop vac is always better for DC, but I can't find it now and I have to assume that I'm misunderstanding something there, or missed something else in that discussion that makes it true for the particular situation. Perhaps large-chip collection or something like that. I am never going to own any power tool that produces anything much bigger than router dust, other than perhaps tiny plywood chips when cleaning an edge. My problem is on the other end of the scale, with fine MDF dust.)

But which one?

The photo that went with the quote above showed HF's "mini" DC, "1 hp", $60:
1 HP Mini Dust Collector

This was the first HF DC setup I've seen on this forum that didn't use the $210 "2 hp" model.

I've not seen any use of the medium model, "portable", also described as 1 hp, but a bit bigger than the $60 1 hp model, perhaps more durable due to being less stressed? $120 right now.
Portable Dust Collector - 13 Gallon

The 2 hp model, which would be great if to just go all-out with, would likely be too much for my basement power circuit, which I intend to upgrade some day, but that won't be any time soon.

The little 1 hp, for half the money sounds great at first. But then, it has some bad reviews for short-lived motor brushes, and generally, for $60 vs $120, I'd probably still rather have the tougher model and understress it.

Does anybody have any experience with the middle model, or side-by-side experience with both 1 hp models?

I notice that while they are both "1 hp", the little one is about 900 CFM vs the bigger one's 600 CFM, so it's got even less vac. strength?

I'd be building a small Thien separator, either way. If the filters aren't good enough, I can vent outside until I add a better one.
-- actually, does that rule out the weaker, higher-CFM model - more volume that'll need pushing through a more restrictive filter?

Last edited by achoox4; 11-07-2014 at 08:15 PM.
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post #22 of 55 (permalink) Old 11-08-2014, 10:07 PM
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I've been badly in need of finally adding proper dust collection to my router
My advice (free and worth every cent) is to take a step back and go with a shop vac for router dust collection. DC's (like those you mentioned) produce a lot of air flow (cfm), but at a relatively low vacuum (static pressure). They're particularly good when you need to move a lot of air for picking up a lot of material and/or large dust particles, such as when using a planer or jointer. Tools such as that usually have dust collection ports 4" or more.

The problem with routers, ROS, and other handheld tools is that the dust port is much smaller- 1-1/2" or less, in my experience. While the big DC's can move a lot of air, they just can't suck enough through that small opening, because they don't have a hich vacuum.

OTOH, a shop vac has higher vacuum, so it can suck dust through that small port better (but isn't nearly as good for the big tools).

My personal rule of thumb is: If the tool dust port is < 2" (e.g. handheld tools), use a shop vac for DC. If the port is 4" (or more), go with a DC.

I have a couple of stationary tools (Ryobi BT3100 table saw and Ridgid band saw) which have 2-1/4" (shop vac hose size) ports. I go with whichever hose is more convenient at the moment. For those, I'm not sure I can tell any difference between my DC and shop vac for dust removal performance.

That said, in deciding on a shop vac, I'd look at how much vacuum it can produce, and how noisy it is. Personally, the high pitch whine of a shop vac is really irritating, to the point that I built an insulated box to hold my vac, and for long sessions use ear muffs.

Finally, the best dust collection equipment you can get is a good respirator mask, esp. when routing and sanding. Your lungs will thank you.

Just my .02 Good luck and keep cutting!
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post #23 of 55 (permalink) Old 11-10-2014, 09:18 AM Thread Starter
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I +1 to John, I'm connecting a shop vac to the router's fence and it works very nicely, almost no dust exposed. The only problem I noticed is when you have to make a groove with a considerable distance from the fence, so the dust goes.. everywhere, since the hose is connected to the fence. In this case, I think a hose that is under the router bit would work.

(I keep being ignored by Dewalt about their dust collection adapter... they didn't provide it with the kit and they won't tell me where/if I can buy it somewhere else...)
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post #24 of 55 (permalink) Old 11-10-2014, 01:02 PM
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Grooving is the one job where the fence pickup doesn't work Pablo. I was considering, like you, to have pickups above and below the table. One company, possibly Incra, has started making their plate insert rings like spoke wheels and this design is supposed to help with under the table dust collection.

John is correct about reducing a 4" line down to 2 1/2" or less. There won't be enough air flow for the DC to work properly. If I were using my DC for the table I would open up another port farther down to keep the air flowing at the right volume and speed.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #25 of 55 (permalink) Old 11-10-2014, 01:51 PM Thread Starter
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Charles, Incra doesn't exists here unfortunately, but in theory my router would be able to have a decent dust collection, check this pic:

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post #26 of 55 (permalink) Old 11-10-2014, 03:52 PM
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Those extra 4 holes around the bit opening should work the same way Pablo. I don't do much grooving on my router table so it has never been a high enough priority for me to have to deal with it yet.

Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #27 of 55 (permalink) Old 11-10-2014, 04:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Artemix View Post
I +1 to John, I'm connecting a shop vac to the router's fence and it works very nicely, almost no dust exposed. The only problem I noticed is when you have to make a groove with a considerable distance from the fence, so the dust goes.. everywhere, since the hose is connected to the fence. In this case, I think a hose that is under the router bit would work.

(I keep being ignored by Dewalt about their dust collection adapter... they didn't provide it with the kit and they won't tell me where/if I can buy it somewhere else...)

Grooving on the router table
under table DC by connecting the hose directly to the router and shut off the fence pickup...
and go w/ a large bit hole in the insert...

welcome to the world of DeWalt CS....
wait till you need to do repairs.....

time to get get creative...
make your own pick up saddle to fit on one side of the router....

if you can find something like this adapt it to work...
no saddle available... make your own from a "T"...
PVC/ABS becomes very malleable at 120 to 130 degrees...
heat guns work really well too....
think thin plastic as in schedule 20....

slit the body of the "T"... heat it and spread it open...
make it fit and clamp it into place with a hose clamp(s)

...
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This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

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post #28 of 55 (permalink) Old 11-10-2014, 05:27 PM Thread Starter
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Stick, yeah, I was going to do something similar to that in case I have to wait forever for Dewalt to answer.
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post #29 of 55 (permalink) Old 11-11-2014, 01:27 AM
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An intriguing possibility is a silicone sleeve for dust collection beneath the table: Review: Keen Dust Router Review. Above and below table dust collection - by ardbeg @ LumberJocks.com ~ woodworking community

I've not bought one myself, so can't attest personally.
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post #30 of 55 (permalink) Old 11-16-2014, 11:58 AM
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I found a used vacuum cleaner from a car wash on Craig's list that works perfect. The hose is flexible and about 15' long. I bought some PVC adapters for my router table, saws and sanders. I paid $20 for it.
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