New to turning tools and lathes. - Router Forums
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post #1 of 25 (permalink) Old 10-04-2018, 11:31 AM Thread Starter
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Default New to turning tools and lathes.

I have not had a lathe till now. I am buying these turning tools and my question is, do I need a parting tool? I have not bought these tools yet but here is a link to what I am buying.

https://www.hartvilletool.com/produc.../turning-tools

Here is a picture of my old lathe but new to me.



I have heard all my life that a lathe is a money pit. I now believe it.
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Don in Murfreesboro,Tn.

Measure once cut twice and it's still to short.
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post #2 of 25 (permalink) Old 10-04-2018, 09:14 PM
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Like any tool, the tool isn’t the expensive part. The money is in the accessories and tooling. A parting tool is handy both for parting a piece off but it can also be used to size the sections. I made one from a flat file that works ok but a purchased one works better. The best ones are hollow ground on the top so that the tip is a spur on both sides.
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Someone I consider a master woodworker once told me that a master woodworker is not someone who never makes mistakes. He is someone who is able to cover them up so that no one can tell.
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post #3 of 25 (permalink) Old 10-05-2018, 07:44 AM
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Sorby makes some good turning tools. I'm not familiar with this particular set but I would check to see if carbide replacement cutters are available as well. Hartville is a solid company that I've dealt with a number of times and they have earned my business. Actually reading a bit more "Cutters are available in 3 different materials - tungsten carbide (TC), high speed steel (HSS), and the titanium nitride (TiN) coated Excelsior line." Makes the tool a bit more versatile.
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post #4 of 25 (permalink) Old 10-05-2018, 08:51 AM
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Don, I have no idea about turning tools but you new (old) lathe looks nice.
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post #5 of 25 (permalink) Old 10-05-2018, 08:59 AM
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The lathe is a "therapeutic" woodworking tool as it is one of the safest tools to use and relaxing to use. There are many accessories you can buy but I suggest only buying what you need to start with (and yes you do need a parting tool, they are inexpensive). You can spend a $1000 on lathe tools and then find you don't need half of them. I would also suggest that you Google your area for a woodturning club. There are numerous books out there but some of them are pretty old and techniques have improved over the years so the club would give you current information. I assume that you own a router and that can be used in conjunction with a lathe for "decorating" lathe pieces. If you like using the lathe look into the American Association of Woodturners. They are a national club whose dues includes a 1st class magazine with many instruction articles for turners at all levels. Many local clubs have professional turners come in and do demos which is also helpful. If you are near or can visit Asheville (at the right time) they have the largest club in the world and have many professionals within their club. They also have the visiting pros give classes (at very low cost --the club subsidizes the costs) Good people and excellent learning opportunities (they have a web site). A mentor for turning is highly recommended to get you started off right. It is easy if done right.
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Last edited by Garyk; 10-05-2018 at 09:03 AM.
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post #6 of 25 (permalink) Old 10-05-2018, 11:45 AM
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Hi Don,

your lathe looks so much like mine, a Rockwell Beaver from the mid 60s I was told from the previous owner. I got an amazing deal. The lathe, motor, and the turning tools all for $150. Since I bought it I built the stand, bought a set os measuring tools, a box with 4 rolls of different sand paper and a larger gouge. I have not used it much but when I do I enjoy it very much. I need to find a jaw set to turn bowls and other stuff. I took a course a while back from a well renown Montreal turner that wrote many magazine articles and has been teaching for years. It was well worth the money.
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post #7 of 25 (permalink) Old 10-05-2018, 11:58 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sreilly View Post
Sorby makes some good turning tools. I'm not familiar with this particular set but I would check to see if carbide replacement cutters are available as well. Hartville is a solid company that I've dealt with a number of times and they have earned my business. Actually reading a bit more "Cutters are available in 3 different materials - tungsten carbide (TC), high speed steel (HSS), and the titanium nitride (TiN) coated Excelsior line." Makes the tool a bit more versatile.
I agree with you Steve Hartville is a good place to buy tools from. I buy just about all my router bits from them. (Whiteside) I know shipping isn't free but I like them having free shipping because I know what the total cost is without going all the way through the buying process and finding I don't like the price they charge me for shipping.

Don in Murfreesboro,Tn.

Measure once cut twice and it's still to short.
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post #8 of 25 (permalink) Old 10-05-2018, 12:07 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Danman1957 View Post
Hi Don,

your lathe looks so much like mine, a Rockwell Beaver from the mid 60s I was told from the previous owner. I got an amazing deal. The lathe, motor, and the turning tools all for $150. Since I bought it I built the stand, bought a set os measuring tools, a box with 4 rolls of different sand paper and a larger gouge. I have not used it much but when I do I enjoy it very much. I need to find a jaw set to turn bowls and other stuff. I took a course a while back from a well renown Montreal turner that wrote many magazine articles and has been teaching for years. It was well worth the money.
Dan, I wish I could take lessons but I don't know anyone that gives them. I think people in the north do more woodworking than we do. I bet it's been 25 years or more since Nashville has had a woodworking show. That makes me mad but that doesn't do any good either.

Don in Murfreesboro,Tn.

Measure once cut twice and it's still to short.
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post #9 of 25 (permalink) Old 10-05-2018, 01:28 PM
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I got my shop in about 1996/97, and got a lathe a little after that. From Harbor Freight no less, for around $70 or so. Surprisingly it was actually better quality than a variety of more expensive machines. In fact it looked like it was made on the same line as one going for around $300. Made a stand for it, and bought a set of HF lathe tools for around $6. The plan was, practice with the HF tools, and practice sharpening them until they wore out, then get a 'good' set. The HF tools worked fine, and never did wear out. Did my sharpening on my small bench top HF belt sander, and that worked great. They needed sharpening likely more often then a 'quality' set, but that was fast and did a good job. Played with it, and great fun. Then decided to make some carving mallets. And found out the only thing I liked to make on it was carving mallets. So, made a dozen or so carving mallets, then sold the lathe. And no regret at all about selling it. However, lately have been thinking of maybe making a small lathe, so I can make a few carving mallets.

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post #10 of 25 (permalink) Old 10-05-2018, 02:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danman1957 View Post
Hi Don,

your lathe looks so much like mine, a Rockwell Beaver from the mid 60s I was told from the previous owner. I got an amazing deal. The lathe, motor, and the turning tools all for $150. Since I bought it I built the stand, bought a set os measuring tools, a box with 4 rolls of different sand paper and a larger gouge. I have not used it much but when I do I enjoy it very much. I need to find a jaw set to turn bowls and other stuff. I took a course a while back from a well renown Montreal turner that wrote many magazine articles and has been teaching for years. It was well worth the money.
Dan, I have a Beaver lathe, identical to yours except for the name plate. Mine is from the early 50's. I bought it used about 40 years ago from a geezer at the time. Beaver was built by The Callander Foundry & Mfg. Co. of Guelph, Ontario. and bought out by Rockwell some years later. I think the only difference between yours and mine is the nameplate. Mine is a small oval on the headstock and doesn't include Rockwell's name. Mine is darker too, almost black but looks like a patina developed over the years. It doesn't get much use but I can't just let it go yet. I think I got it for a song at the time.
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