The Shop at Casa Loco -- a project in process. - Page 4 - Router Forums
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post #31 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-02-2019, 07:24 AM
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@Sominus ...

any progress???

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #32 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-02-2019, 07:31 PM
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Sawblade in the face and neck! That would be a nasty way to learn a lesson. Lucky he didn't hit the jugler.
Why was there a jugler in his shop?
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post #33 of 38 (permalink) Old 09-02-2019, 08:39 PM Thread Starter
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So this weekend was one where I played a lot of catch-up from Working for the past 6 weeks straight..
I did manage to do some more demo in the shop, and started actually reconstructing the “easy” wall.

One thing I’ve discussed with a couple knowledgeable folks is the fact that this garage was horrifically underbuilt. The wall studs are at 20” on center, the ceiling ties are at 40”, there is no cohesive construct that you can call a beam tying everything together. The problem with all of these things added together is that there is a lot of flex in the building and no real strength in the ceiling, which means that the desire to use the “attic” as storage can’t happen, and adding plywood to the ceiling would overstress the ties, causing structural,failure.

Originally the thought was that I would insulate the walls and use OSB to sheath the walls. To add structural rigidity, I switched to 1/2” plywood. Since the studs are 20” on center, that means that the edge of a piece of plywood will only naturally find another stud on every fifth sheet. To solve this, rather than cut every sheet to lay on a stud, I put a 1x4 behind each free edge and toenailed it to the top and bottom plate, then screwed the plywood into it (see the pic). The plywood is attached to the walls with ring-shank siding nails, and is lifted about 1/2” from the floor to avoid moisture damage over time.

This pic shows the first sheet being hung...
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post #34 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-16-2019, 09:54 AM Thread Starter
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So in our last installment, there was a sheet of plywood attached to an insulated wall, just minding its own business.

One task which I had been avoiding due to the Texas heat (the air conditioner barely keeps up in the garage) was dismantling a built-in workbench in the rear corner of the garage. This dismantling had to occur in order for the project to continue. The weather finally gave a bit of a break and temperatures were in the crisp, cool upper 80s, so I decided to attack with great glee. Whoever built the piece of crap bench did so using good, strong lumber and extremely large ring shank nails. However, I was able to salvage some lumber from the top (some good, long 2x6s). There was a problem as I got into the base against the corner of the garage: Old termite damage. The bottom plate was eaten up for about 8 feet on the side wall, and about 4 feet along the back wall.

After digging out, cleaning up and pulling out all the punky wood, I replaced the (bad) portion of the bottom plate and shored up the wall with new studs sistered to the existing ones.

The recent purchase of a new siding nailer, framing nailer and jigsaw have come in VERY handy for this job. Also, I would *highly* recommend a self-leveling 3 axis laser level -- its been a life saver (you'll see in future postings why.. :-) )

Here are some pictures of the damage, which I know you're dying to see.
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Last edited by Sominus; 10-16-2019 at 10:00 AM.
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post #35 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-16-2019, 12:26 PM
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Barrier? Eh? Do I need to put plastic sheeting in over the studs before I put up fiberglass?
I put radiant barrier between studs, it's that aluminum "bubble wrap" and it really helps keep heat in, or out. If you have a lot of humidity, I'd think twice about sealing the studs in with plastic. It would be easy for mold to form.

One thing I did that has helped keep flat surfaces clear, was to put in wire shelving that's easily adjusted for height. Floor to 6 ft with about 16 inches between the bottom of the mounting bar and floor. Then I bought a bunch of very standard sealed plastic boxes in two sizes. They stack together nicely. All my small stuff goes into one of these boxes, one for electrical stuff, two for frame making, more for router stuff including bits in their original packaging, etc.

Makes for a very neat looking area, and inked labels on the ends make it easy to put stuff back.

However, my bad habit is pulling out many tools for a project and then leaving them out on my bench and any other flat surface I can find. Then I have a put away orgy once in awhile and it stays fairly neat until the next project. One other problem is I have a few buiky cartons of stuff I haven't unpacked or used yet. There really isn't a lot of room for storing flat goods either, and maybe I need to move that out into the DC chamber. The way it is now, the flat goods block a long counter on one end of the shop, and once something gets on that counter, it's there forever.

I feel your pain. And the wire shelves work much better than fixed shelving units.

The more I do, the less I accomplish.
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post #36 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-16-2019, 12:54 PM Thread Starter
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I put radiant barrier between studs, it's that aluminum "bubble wrap" and it really helps keep heat in, or out. If you have a lot of humidity, I'd think twice about sealing the studs in with plastic. It would be easy for mold to form.
As there has been moisture infiltration here and there in the past, it is necessary to put up a barrier to keep the insulation from getting wet and retaining water (leading to an even greater risk of mold. It is a trade-off. Since the bare wall will no longer be exposed (it is being sheathed with plywood), promoting an as-dry-as-possible environment in the insulated wall space is important. The plywood sheathing is lifted about 1/2" off the floor in case we get some moisture buildup there. While there hasn't been standing water on the floor, per se, there has been moisture present on the floor (think 'sweating' or extremely high humidity/temp) during some of the coastal weather events when the humidity and temp gets up into the high 90s and rain is just cascading from the skies in biblical proportion. Keeping the doors closed helps with that, but it isn't a 100% surety. I suspect that as I continue the project and address the doors, the problem will likely be all but gone.

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post #37 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-16-2019, 02:43 PM
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so what does the T'mite repair look like...

This would have been the week that I'd have finished chewing thru the restraints...
If only new layers hadn't been added....

Stick....
Forget the primal scream, just ROAR!!!
"SNORK Mountain Congressional Library and Taxidermy”
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post #38 of 38 (permalink) Old 10-16-2019, 03:05 PM Thread Starter
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Forgot to take a pic of that before buttoning the wall up... I was tired, it was getting late, and the beer was calling. Loudly. :-)

Actually wait... My wife got a pic of it. I'll get it off her phone.

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