Question: What is the preferred flooring? - Router Forums
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 11-01-2011, 01:28 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Eric
Posts: 52
 
Default Question: What is the preferred flooring?

Here are some photos of my current workshop. It consists of 1/2 of a garage bay, which it shares with motorcycles. In order to get any work done, both of the cars have to be moved out from the other two (2) bays. So the 1/2 bay is just a storage area for the equipment when not in use. The problem is that all the equipment has to be "put away" when I am done.

Luckily for me, my wife has decided that she wants the garage bay with the motorcycles and woodworking equipment, for another car. This is good for me, because, I get to design and build another 560 sqft workshop under the current garage. I would like to do it correctly the first time, so after reviewing the many different workshops on this forum, I would like some input on what flooring do people prefer for their workshop. The floor will consist of engineered joists with 1-1/4" x 4' x 8' T&G plywood on top. This is where I get stumped. Do I just prep & paint the plywood, or should I put some heavy-duty tile on top of it? How about matting? How about 3/4" oak T&G flooring? How about 6" wide pine planks?

I have some pretty heavy equipment as you can see from the photos: Surface Planer - 950 lbs, Jointer (not pictured) - 550 lbs, Table Saw - 350 lbs, Drill press - 275 lbs. etc. All of the equipment is currently on wheels and will probably stay that way in the new workshop.

So, please help me out with this question:

What flooring do you prefer in your workshop?

If you would like to add some additional comments regarding your preference, that would be great also.

Thanks for all your input.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Workshop_04.jpg
Views:	84
Size:	70.8 KB
ID:	47056  

Click image for larger version

Name:	Workshop_05B.jpg
Views:	89
Size:	52.9 KB
ID:	47057  

Click image for larger version

Name:	Workshop_03B.jpg
Views:	88
Size:	65.6 KB
ID:	47058  

Click image for larger version

Name:	Workshop_06.jpg
Views:	89
Size:	83.1 KB
ID:	47059  

ORBlackFZ1 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 11-01-2011, 02:03 AM
Forum Contributor
 
xplorx4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Country: United States
First Name: Jerry
Posts: 10,671
 
Default

Concrete works for me, that is what was there making the price right.

Wisdom: Where experience and knowledge combine and become one.

"We are all one decision away from Stupid!!"

Lamentations 3:22-23

"How often we sacrifice the permanent plans of God on the altar of immediate solutions"

I have a very good memory, just short is all.
xplorx4 is offline  
post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 11-01-2011, 08:06 AM
Registered User
 
paduke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Country: United States
First Name: Bill
Posts: 1,184
 
Default

concrete with fatique pads at work stations. I would rather spend coins on widgets and gadgets than sleepers and plywood but if you are going this route consider floor receptacles for stationary equipment
paduke is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 11-01-2011, 11:53 AM
Registered User
 
RJM60's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Country: United States
First Name: Robert
Posts: 655
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ORBlackFZ1 View Post
... I get to design and build another 560 sqft workshop under the current garage.

.... The floor will consist of engineered joists with 1-1/4" x 4' x 8' T&G plywood on top. This is where I get stumped. Do I just prep & paint the plywood, or should I put some heavy-duty tile on top of it? How about matting? How about 3/4" oak T&G flooring? How about 6" wide pine planks?

I have some pretty heavy equipment as you can see from the photos: Surface Planer - 950 lbs, Jointer (not pictured) - 550 lbs, Table Saw - 350 lbs, Drill press - 275 lbs. etc. All of the equipment is currently on wheels and will probably stay that way in the new workshop.

So, please help me out with this question:

What flooring do you prefer in your workshop?

If you would like to add some additional comments regarding your preference, that would be great also.

Thanks for all your input.
I'm confused by "under the current garage". Please explain.

Although the 1-1/4 ply subfloor is probably adequate for a workshop, if it was my floor, I would definately cover it with something. The covering would protect the subfloor, make it smoother (for cleanup and such), and help seal the shop from whatever is below (for odors, dust, etc).

The oak you suggested would look nice and, if affordability is not an issue, would make a really nice workshop floor. I wouldn't use soft pine; it'l gett messed up fast. Although my first reaction to linoleum (or similar) tile was negative, commercial tiles might be a good idea if glued down well and sealed.

One other thing; if it was my shop, I'd use solid blocking (cut tight to the engineered joist) for cross bracing.

“The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place.”
George Bernard Shaw

Robert
Redondo Beach, CA
RJM60 is offline  
post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 11-01-2011, 01:47 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Eric
Posts: 52
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by paduke View Post
concrete with fatique pads at work stations.
I should explain a little more about "under the garage". The current house/garage is built on a hillside. The garage has a 10' to 16' high "crawlspace" underneath it. The garage is on a post and beam system. The system consists of one 30' beam with five (5) posts and the foundation walls supporting the garage. Each beam is supported by a 30" diameter footer. I have already had a structural engineer completing the engineering work necessary to replace all the post and beam system with only one beam that spans the 30'. The existing five (5) footers will be used to support the new floor.

Pouring concrete is not an economical option, because the existing ground is at a steep slant. The floor joists and plywood are much more economical in this situation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by paduke View Post
I would rather spend coins on widgets and gadgets....
Amen!

Quote:
Originally Posted by paduke View Post
....than sleepers and plywood but if you are going this route consider floor receptacles for stationary equipment
Excellent suggestion! I will definitely put the electrical outlets in the floor.

Thank you very much!
ORBlackFZ1 is offline  
post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 11-01-2011, 01:59 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Eric
Posts: 52
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RJM60 View Post
I'm confused by "under the current garage". Please explain.
I should explain a little more about "under the garage". The current house/garage is built on a hillside. The garage has a 10' to 16' high "crawlspace" underneath it. The garage is on a post and beam system. The system consists of one 30' beam with five (5) posts and the foundation walls supporting the garage. Each beam is supported by a 30" diameter footer. I have already had a structural engineer completing the engineering work necessary to replace all the post and beam system with only one beam that spans the 30'. The existing five (5) footers will be used to support the new floor.


Quote:
Originally Posted by RJM60 View Post
Although the 1-1/4 ply subfloor is probably adequate for a workshop, if it was my floor, I would definately cover it with something. The covering would protect the subfloor, make it smoother (for cleanup and such), and help seal the shop from whatever is below (for odors, dust, etc).

The oak you suggested would look nice and, if affordability is not an issue, would make a really nice workshop floor. I wouldn't use soft pine; it'l gett messed up fast. Although my first reaction to linoleum (or similar) tile was negative, commercial tiles might be a good idea if glued down well and sealed.
Good suggestions. I will look into the commercial tile. I have laid gorgeous oak flooring in my house and it has worked very well. I am still debating with myself on how I would feel to spend a couple of weeks laying a gorgeous oak floor in my workshop only to move my 950 lb surface planer on to it.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by RJM60 View Post
One other thing; if it was my shop, I'd use solid blocking (cut tight to the engineered joist) for cross bracing.
Interesting suggestion. I am assuming that you are trying to prevent the joists from moving laterally with this suggestion. Is there a story here? or are you writing hypothetically?
ORBlackFZ1 is offline  
post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 11-01-2011, 03:28 PM
Registered User
 
RJM60's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Country: United States
First Name: Robert
Posts: 655
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ORBlackFZ1 View Post
Interesting suggestion. I am assuming that you are trying to prevent the joists from moving laterally with this suggestion. Is there a story here? or are you writing hypothetically?
Cross bracing (or cross strapping) is for preventing the joists from twisting. Blocking is a little harder to install but much better than cross strapping. The builder can make blocking from the engineered joists.

**************

Would it be a bad idea to put vaccuum lines in the floor as well as power? You could at least make straight runs between the joists and come up at the wall. I think the only issue would be clogs, but I've never had any.

“The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place.”
George Bernard Shaw

Robert
Redondo Beach, CA
RJM60 is offline  
post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 11-03-2011, 08:24 PM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Eric
Posts: 52
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RJM60 View Post
Cross bracing (or cross strapping) is for preventing the joists from twisting. Blocking is a little harder to install but much better than cross strapping. The builder can make blocking from the engineered joists.
That makes sense. Thanks for the explanation. I would "assume" that with engineered joists the blocking would be preferred over the cross strapping, due to the unequal thickness of the engineered joist.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RJM60 View Post
Would it be a bad idea to put vaccuum lines in the floor as well as power? You could at least make straight runs between the joists and come up at the wall. I think the only issue would be clogs, but I've never had any.
That is an interesting suggestion. I was not planning on putting dust collection in the flooring. I would think the cons would out way the pros.

Pros:
1. Out of site
2. Quieter dust collection

Cons:
1. Difficult to find clogs
2. Difficult to clean out clogs
3. Cost to change equipment flow with a fixed dust collection outlets
4. Dedicated use for floor space vs. flexibility to change to another use (next home owner wants to use it as a recreation room?)

Thanks for the input.
ORBlackFZ1 is offline  
post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 11-04-2011, 12:27 PM
Registered User
 
RJM60's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Country: United States
First Name: Robert
Posts: 655
 
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ORBlackFZ1 View Post
That is an interesting suggestion. I was not planning on putting dust collection in the flooring. I would think the cons would out way the pros.

Pros:
1. Out of site
2. Quieter dust collection

Cons:
1. Difficult to find clogs
2. Difficult to clean out clogs
3. Cost to change equipment flow with a fixed dust collection outlets
4. Dedicated use for floor space vs. flexibility to change to another use (next home owner wants to use it as a recreation room?)

Thanks for the input.
I don't think you'll get any clogs but if you do, they should be easy to clean out. After all, central vacuums for a house use 2"-2-1/2" lines.

I guess I was really thinking just one for the table saw, which usually occupies a central location in any shop. It should be possible to locate it to accomodate small changes in TS location. Anyway, it was just a thought.

“The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place.”
George Bernard Shaw

Robert
Redondo Beach, CA
RJM60 is offline  
post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 11-09-2012, 01:57 AM Thread Starter
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Country: United States
First Name: Eric
Posts: 52
 
Default GarageDeck for Woodshop Floor?

The new woodshop is almost done. YEAH! The final coat of mudd still has to be finished, the wall texturing needs to be applied, the walls and ceiling need to be painted, the new overhead door has to be installed, the bathroom fixtures need to be installed and the floor needs to be ordered and installed. (I attached the latest photos to this post.)

After much consideration about the flooring, I have finally settled on using interlocking floor mats for the floor. They are easy to put down, easy to take up (if I don't like them), appear to be durable, are nice looking and reasonable priced.

Over the last couple of months, I have been evaluating interlocking floor mats. The only one to survive under my surface planer for 24 hours without denting is the GarageDeck model. GarageDeck | Coin-Top Modular Garage Flooring Tiles | BigFloors.com The price is pretty reasonable at $1.89/sqft.

Has anyone used GarageDeck in their woodshop? What did you like/dislike about it?

Thanks for the input in advance.

I am looking forward to being able to move in! 450 sqft of woodshop floor space and a full bathroom and utility sink for cleanup! Life is good!

Eric
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DrywallAnd2ndCoatMudd_04.jpg
Views:	46
Size:	67.5 KB
ID:	56505  

Click image for larger version

Name:	DrywallAnd2ndCoatMudd_05.jpg
Views:	51
Size:	65.2 KB
ID:	56506  

Click image for larger version

Name:	DrywallAnd2ndCoatMudd_06.jpg
Views:	45
Size:	65.5 KB
ID:	56507  

ORBlackFZ1 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Router Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Howdy! and a tongue and groove question rickbob New Member Introductions 8 12-03-2010 01:03 PM
Laminate Flooring berry General Routing 9 04-24-2009 11:01 PM
5 Tips When Choosing Hardwood Flooring John_smith Project Plans and How To 0 10-17-2008 06:19 AM
DC Question angus Lobby 3 03-31-2008 07:29 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome